After you have glued the photo to the matting paper, then cut the other two sides so that you end up with a frame around the photos. An ideal mat will provide a visual space between the paper and the photo, regardless as to whether you’re using a solid color or not. When selecting the color of the mat, you should first consider the dominant color together with the minor colors in the background.
An international standard, ISO 18902, provides specific guidelines on materials that are safe for scrapbooking through its requirements for albums, framing, and storage materials. ISO 18902 includes requirements for photo-safety and a specific pH range for acid-free materials. ISO 18902 prohibits the use of harmful materials, including Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and Cellulose nitrate.
While some people prefer the physicality of the actual artifacts they paste onto the pages of books, the digital scrapbooking hobby has grown in popularity in recent years.[25] Some of the advantages include a greater diversity of materials, less environmental impact, cost savings, the ability to share finished pages more readily on the internet, and the use of image editing software to experiment with manipulating page elements in multiple ways without making permanent adjustments.[26] A traditional scrapbook layout may employ a background paper with a torn edge. While a physical page can only be torn once and never restored, a digital paper can be torn and untorn with ease, allowing the scrapbooker to try out different looks without wasting supplies. Some web-based digital scrapbooks include a variety of wallpapers and backgrounds to help the users create a rich visual experience. Each paper, photo, or embellishment exists on its own layer in your document, and you can reposition them at your discretion.[27]
And, for your chance to be a WINNER WINNER CHICKEN DINNER Peep here at SMS let's give DoCrafts Jon, from across the Pond a hearty shout out! Tell him just how much you LOVE their Anita's Foiled Decoupage if you have played with them before! Or...if this is your first time seeing these goodies from DoCrafts, tell him how much you would LOVE to try his foiled decoupage.
Patterned paper enhances your scrapbooking by effortlessly adding colour, energy, and emotion. You can establish any theme you want for a page by simply gluing your choice of patterned paper on top of your cardstock. Patterned paper is generally sold in packs containing a variety of design options. You can use this paper to create an attractive border for a page or page element like a picture, or use it to cover an entire page.
Once you’ve successfully picked the photos, the next step involves selecting a patterned paper for your background, which will not only add color to the page, but also depth. By using patterned paper, you’ll be able to mirror the story that you are trying to tell with photos. Depending on the theme, look, and style, you may be able to find themed papers that will suit your every need. All in all, when selecting the patterned paper, you should select a pattern that enhances your theme.

Basic materials include background papers (including printed and cardstock paper), photo corner mounts (or other means of mounting photos such as adhesive dots, photo mounting tape, or acid-free glue), scissors, a paper trimmer or cutting tool, art pens, archival pens for journaling, and mounting glues (like thermo-tac). More elaborate designs require more specialized tools such as die cut templates, rubber stamps, craft punches, stencils, inking tools, eyelet setters, heat embossing tools and personal die cut machines. A lot of time people who enjoy scrapbooking will create their own background papers by using the tools mentioned along with "fancy" textured scissors.
K&Company-Scrapbook Kit: Vacation. Perfectly coordinated to make it easy for you to beautifully showcase your memories! This package contains one 8x8 inch designer scrapbook, ten top-loading pages, twenty designer papers with a different design on each side, 166 die-cut stickers, nine grand adhesions and fifty-four clearly yours stickers. Imported.

This book was created by the makers of the Simple Scrapbooks magazine. It's a great resource for people who want to create simple and contemporary scrapbooks. It's well organized and has all kinds of great tips for a beginner scrapbooker and examples to inspire advanced scrapbookers. There are plenty of ideas for scrapbook albums, layouts, journaling, use of colors and patterns, etc. Probably the best scrapbooking book I've read so far.
Jump up ^ Sensational Page Ideas for Scrapbooks. Cincinnati, OH: Memory Makers. 2004. p. 31. ISBN 1-892127-49-0. Your hands should be clean and oil free when handling photographs and documents. Oil and dirt can rub off your fingers and onto the documents and photos causing damage and deterioration. Using a pair of inexpensive photography cotton gloves will help keep oily fingerprints from causing long-term damage.

And, for your chance to be a WINNER WINNER CHICKEN DINNER Peep here at SMS let's give DoCrafts Jon, from across the Pond a hearty shout out! Tell him just how much you LOVE their Anita's Foiled Decoupage if you have played with them before! Or...if this is your first time seeing these goodies from DoCrafts, tell him how much you would LOVE to try his foiled decoupage.

An international standard, ISO 18902, provides specific guidelines on materials that are safe for scrapbooking through its requirements for albums, framing, and storage materials. ISO 18902 includes requirements for photo-safety and a specific pH range for acid-free materials. ISO 18902 prohibits the use of harmful materials, including Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and Cellulose nitrate.


Many consider journaling one of the most important elements of any scrapbook.[29] Journaling is a personal choice and it can describe the event, the photographs, or relate feelings and emotions. Handwritten journaling is considered best by some scrapbookers who see handwriting as valuable for posterity, but many people journal on the computer and print it onto a variety of surfaces including vellum, tape, ribbon, and paper.
During the 19th century, scrapbooking was seen as a more involved way to preserve one’s experiences than journaling or other writing-based forms of logging. Printed material such as cheap newspapers, visiting cards, playbills, and pamphlets circulated widely during the 19th century and often became the primary components of peoples’ scrapbooks.[5] The growing volume of ephemera of this kind, parallel to the growth of industrialized society, created a demand for methods of cataloguing and preserving them. This is why scrapbooks devoted solely to cataloguing recipes, coupons, or other lists were also common during this time. Until later in the 19th century, scrapbooks were seen as functional as well as aesthetically pleasing.[6] Several factors, including marketing strategies and technological advancement, contributed to the image of scrapbooking moving further toward the aesthetic plane over the years.
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