Instant cameras and film are ridiculously fun, creative ways for making and sharing memories. Paste them into books, with as much or as little text as you desire, or pick a wall in your home/office to create a personalized art installation. They can be used to make a baby book or be more travel-centric. Also, whether you have a classic Polaroid or a new Instax, they are so easy to use, that your kids can have their own roll of film to capture memories of their own. Photo strips from photo booths work great, too!
Your scrapbook album is where you'll arrange and store your decorated memories. Choose an album that's an appropriate size and has the right number of pages for the project you're undertaking. The three basic album sizes are 8” x 8”, 8” x 11” and 12” x 12.” Albums are sold in a variety of colors, patterns and materials. Be sure to choose a durable material that will last as long as the items inside. 
Organizing your tools and paper is half the battle in putting together the ultimate scrapbook. A storage system with lots of drawers will help keep a tidy workspace and work more efficiently. If you're an on-the-go scrapbooker, choose a scrapbook tote with several pockets for all of your art supplies. Totes are ideal for scrapbooking during vacations or getting together with friends for an afternoon of arts and crafts. 
Old scrapbooks tended to have photos mounted with photomounting corners and perhaps notations of who was in a photo or where and when it was taken. They often included bits of memorabilia like newspaper clippings, letters, etc. An early known American scrapbooker and inventor of scrapbooking supplies was Mark Twain. Twain carried scrapbooks on his travels as he collected souvenirs, clippings and pictures.[8][9][10]

During the 19th century, scrapbooking was seen as a more involved way to preserve one’s experiences than journaling or other writing-based forms of logging. Printed material such as cheap newspapers, visiting cards, playbills, and pamphlets circulated widely during the 19th century and often became the primary components of peoples’ scrapbooks.[5] The growing volume of ephemera of this kind, parallel to the growth of industrialized society, created a demand for methods of cataloguing and preserving them. This is why scrapbooks devoted solely to cataloguing recipes, coupons, or other lists were also common during this time. Until later in the 19th century, scrapbooks were seen as functional as well as aesthetically pleasing.[6] Several factors, including marketing strategies and technological advancement, contributed to the image of scrapbooking moving further toward the aesthetic plane over the years.
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