And, for your chance to be a WINNER WINNER CHICKEN DINNER Peep here at SMS let's give DoCrafts Jon, from across the Pond a hearty shout out! Tell him just how much you LOVE their Anita's Foiled Decoupage if you have played with them before! Or...if this is your first time seeing these goodies from DoCrafts, tell him how much you would LOVE to try his foiled decoupage.

Once you’ve successfully picked the photos, the next step involves selecting a patterned paper for your background, which will not only add color to the page, but also depth. By using patterned paper, you’ll be able to mirror the story that you are trying to tell with photos. Depending on the theme, look, and style, you may be able to find themed papers that will suit your every need. All in all, when selecting the patterned paper, you should select a pattern that enhances your theme.
Digital scrapbooking has advanced to the point where digital scrapbook layouts may be made entirely online using Web-based software. Users upload their photos, create a digital scrapbook layout using a Web page and digital scrapbook graphics. The layout can then be downloaded as a low-resolution JPEG file for sharing on the Web or as a high-resolution JPEG file for printing.
I actually just got started into rubber stamping and die cutting and stuff. (I have had a Sizzix Big Kick machine for years, and haven't used it much.  Finding out that these die cuts that are available with some stamps work with this machine, got me into using it again!)  You see, I do cross stitch.  But the magazines I get from the bookstore comes from the uk.  And two magazines went out of production, so there aren't many  cross stitch designs for cards, anymore.  So i thought i would try cross stitching designs with rubber stamping (cling/clear, whatever you call it) combined!
I have been buying from Stacey since I found her about three years ago. I love her video classes and she is so real you can't help but love her. The only reason I didn't give this review 5 stars is because of the shipping times. Yes!!! She means it ship when it ships. She tells you up front so don't grow impatient. You will get your stuff and you will be happy with it. I ordered from the last big sale (July 16, 2016) and still haven't gotten my product. The thing is....you can't get the SMS products anywhere else. Her products are exclusive and really good and the prices are fair. She tries to give you as much for your money as she possibly can. She really cares. I have never been to the store (it is on my bucket list) but I have learned so much from her. All I can say is that the SMS products are yummy and she is so cute and the SMS team is doing the best they can. Have some patience - it's hard I know but it will be well worth it!
In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.
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