This is a really cute store with everything you need for cards and scrapbooking. I came here for their "garage sale" and bought wonderful things for unbelievable prices. Their normal items are at reasonable also. BUT...if you order anything online it takes a very long to receive, regardless of "shop that didn't hop" sales. I've been waiting 10 weeks and they still cannot give me a delivery time of my products, some items are in stock but will be delivered with the "close out" items. Very disappointing.

A friend and I went to this store in August 2013 and I ordered a $ 9 stamp set and she ordered a Halloween die for less then $10.  The store sale was 20% off entire store. My friend grabbed the last stamp "My Favorite Things a la modes Fight like a Girl" and so I paid for it and Stacey said she would still give us the 20% off and ship both our orders to us free since they were out of stock on these items.  I gave her my address to mail both items to save her shipping costs.
During the 19th century, scrapbooking was seen as a more involved way to preserve one’s experiences than journaling or other writing-based forms of logging. Printed material such as cheap newspapers, visiting cards, playbills, and pamphlets circulated widely during the 19th century and often became the primary components of peoples’ scrapbooks.[5] The growing volume of ephemera of this kind, parallel to the growth of industrialized society, created a demand for methods of cataloguing and preserving them. This is why scrapbooks devoted solely to cataloguing recipes, coupons, or other lists were also common during this time. Until later in the 19th century, scrapbooks were seen as functional as well as aesthetically pleasing.[6] Several factors, including marketing strategies and technological advancement, contributed to the image of scrapbooking moving further toward the aesthetic plane over the years.
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