Please do NOT purchase anything online or order in the store or you may wait over 3 months like me to receive your PAID product!!! A friend and I went to this store in August 2013 and I ordered a $ 9 stamp set and she ordered a Halloween die for less then $10. The store sale was 20% off entire store. My friend grabbed the last stamp "My Favorite Things a la modes Fight like a Girl" and so I paid for it and Stacey said she would still give us the 20% off and ship both our orders to us free since they were out of stock on these items. I gave her my address to mail both items to save her shipping costs. A couple of months went by and I contacted Stacey on her facebook page for the store 12/9/13 inquiring about our product. She told me our order was mailed out late October 2013 and she would contact USPS and if she had to then resend another order and call me to verify my address. I left my address on her facebook page and still have not heard from her as of DECEMBER 14, 2013 !! I filled out a complaint online to the Better Business Bureau. I received a confirmation email from BBB stating she has until January 17, 2014 to respond to this complaint. I read Several complaints on her facebook page about the poor or lack of customer service on prepaid orders, especially online orders never being fulfilled, customers never being contacted on their orders. Stacey's response to one lady was "We are a small Mom and Pop shop...." WOW ! Really! I think it's ridiculous that she continues to have Big sales events, free make and takes every weekend, and people are prepaying for orders either in her store or online and yet we all sit here and wait for our PREPAID merchandise !!! Doesn't matter if a store is big or small...Customer's shouldn't have to wait over 3 months to receive something they already paid for and not one person from her store contact the customer!!!
The advent of scanners, desktop publishing, page layout programs, and advanced printing options make it relatively easy to create professional-looking layouts in digital form. The internet allows scrapbookers to self-publish their work. Scrapbooks that exist completely in digital image form are referred to as "digital scrapbooks" or "computer scrapbooks".[24]

Early digital scrapbooks were created from digital photos uploaded to an external site. Over time, this moved to a model of downloading software onto a personal computer that will organize photos and help create the digital scrapbook. With the growth of Web 2.0 functionality, digital scrapbooking is going back online, to avoid the hassles of having to download and install PC software. The availability of cheap online storage (e.g., on Amazon's S3 service), and the desire to leverage pre-uploaded online albums (e.g., on Yahoo's Flickr) make it more convenient for users to directly compose their digital scrapbooks online. Print on demand fulfillment enables such digital scrapbooks to effectively supplant traditional scrapbooks.
Scrapbooking crops (or "Crops") are events where 2 or more scrapbookers gather to work in a social circle on their books, cards or other projects. It is similar to the old quilting bees that used to be socially prevalent, but has been replaced by today's "Crop". Attendees bring specific supplies themselves to work on said projects and sometimes there are vendors at these events to purchase any extra scrapbooking needs. At these events ideas are shared, techniques are taught to one another, products used (e.g. cutting machines such as, Silhouette & Cricut) are learned about and attendees have a few hours to days of uninterrupted time to work on their scrapbooks, cards, or any project they are needing to accomplish. Events are planned informally at one's home, a church hall or establishments with meeting rooms to the larger attended crops that encompass days of time in a hotel, where the attendee stays in the same hotel and works in the large ballroom or conference rooms in the hotel with tens to hundreds of attendees. Some of the ways to learn about events are mainly through word of mouth, social media and community postings.
This is a really cute store with everything you need for cards and scrapbooking. I came here for their "garage sale" and bought wonderful things for unbelievable prices. Their normal items are at reasonable also. BUT...if you order anything online it takes a very long to receive, regardless of "shop that didn't hop" sales. I've been waiting 10 weeks and they still cannot give me a delivery time of my products, some items are in stock but will be delivered with the "close out" items. Very disappointing.

I have been buying from Stacey since I found her about three years ago.  I love her video classes and she is so real you can't help but love her.  The only reason I didn't give this review 5 stars is because of the shipping times.  Yes!!! She means it ship when it ships. She tells you up front so don't grow impatient.  You will get your stuff and you will be happy with it.  I ordered from the last big sale (July 16, 2016) and still haven't gotten my product.  The thing is....you can't get the SMS products anywhere else.  Her products are exclusive and really good and the prices are fair.  She tries to give you as much for your money as she possibly can.  She really cares.  I have never been to the store (it is on my bucket list) but I have learned so much from her.  All I can say is that the SMS products are yummy and she is so cute and the SMS team is doing the best they can.  Have some patience - it's hard I know but it will be well worth it!
Page trimmers allow you to cut paper cleanly and precisely. Use a page trimmer when you need to cut cardstock, patterned paper, or pictures to fit neatly into your album. You can save time by stacking multiple pages in your trimmer and cutting them simultaneously. For smaller cutting tasks, use a sturdy pair of scissors. Long-bladed scissors are helpful for quick cutting jobs that require flexibility, such as cutting out letters or tricky shapes. Scissors are also handy for cutting scrapbook embellishments like ribbons and stamps.
Old scrapbooks tended to have photos mounted with photomounting corners and perhaps notations of who was in a photo or where and when it was taken. They often included bits of memorabilia like newspaper clippings, letters, etc. An early known American scrapbooker and inventor of scrapbooking supplies was Mark Twain. Twain carried scrapbooks on his travels as he collected souvenirs, clippings and pictures.[8][9][10]
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