Then, we add in the latest 12 colors of I... Zink Diamond Glitter by Aladine and you have a WINNER WINNER CHICKEN DINNER. Yep, this is the glitter that needs no glue and drys in a snap. Seriously, in most cases it dries in under a minute. No more leaving your projects to dry over night or worse yet....smudging them when you accidentally touch them!!!
Instant cameras and film are ridiculously fun, creative ways for making and sharing memories. Paste them into books, with as much or as little text as you desire, or pick a wall in your home/office to create a personalized art installation. They can be used to make a baby book or be more travel-centric. Also, whether you have a classic Polaroid or a new Instax, they are so easy to use, that your kids can have their own roll of film to capture memories of their own. Photo strips from photo booths work great, too!
Whatever theme you've chosen for your scrapbook, you'll need a few essentials to get started. First, you'll need an album and its basic contents: cardstock, patterned paper and page protectors. Next, you need a selection of tools and supplies, including pencils, coloured markers, adhesives, a ruler and a page trimmer. Embellishments are an exciting part of scrapbooking. Your choice of ribbons, glitter or 3D stickers will inject your personality into your scrapbook and make the individual pages stand out. Staying organized is essential: a basic storage system will help keep your mind and workspace tidy so you can focus on being creative and having fun. 
Cardstock is the firm paper onto which you’ll glue your photos and embellishments. Typically, it's more flexible than paperboard, but stiffer than standard paper. You can find cardstock in a wide range of solid colours, patterns and textures, so it's easy to choose a look that matches your theme. Consider solid-colour cardstock if you plan on tearing pages for effect and don't want to expose an unattractive white core. Look for acid and lignin-free cardstock for decorated pages that will resist fading and discolouring over time.
Our Designer Templates were designed to help you take advantage of that stack of paper that you’ve probably been hanging on to. They are a simple, back-to-basics tool for cutting universally appealing shapes out of your paper that will result in gorgeous scrapbook layouts in half the time! But that is only one small part of what this product can do for you! Let’s show you what we mean!

In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.

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