Now, wha...t do we have for you today? Welp, how about a chance to be a WINNER WINNER and receive a wonderful prize package form SMS filled with the latest and greatest collection from Contour Creations? What do you have to post? Well, Aussie Andrew got the crazy idea to head on down to Florida to talk to a certain retailer about a Couture Creations - Scrapbooking Made Simple - Simply Defined Collaboration. For a chance to WIN, all you have to do is post what retailer YOU think he went to visit!!! And, just as an FYI, I am so not holding my breath about this! It might just be a bit outside MY comfort zone :)
And, for your chance to be a WINNER WINNER CHICKEN DINNER Peep here at SMS let's give DoCrafts Jon, from across the Pond a hearty shout out! Tell him just how much you LOVE their Anita's Foiled Decoupage if you have played with them before! Or...if this is your first time seeing these goodies from DoCrafts, tell him how much you would LOVE to try his foiled decoupage.
Now, there is a story that goes with this collection and why I name it what I did! It has to do with my dad and what I didn't understand as a child, but the older and wiser Stacey now does! I have a few fun ...techniques for you that really help to show off how useful these dies, stamps and hot foil plates can be! And, if you need guy cards or you love animals, I think this collection is just for you!
Please do NOT purchase anything online or order in the store or you may wait over 3 months like me to receive your PAID product!!! A friend and I went to this store in August 2013 and I ordered a $ 9 stamp set and she ordered a Halloween die for less then $10. The store sale was 20% off entire store. My friend grabbed the last stamp "My Favorite Things a la modes Fight like a Girl" and so I paid for it and Stacey said she would still give us the 20% off and ship both our orders to us free since they were out of stock on these items. I gave her my address to mail both items to save her shipping costs. A couple of months went by and I contacted Stacey on her facebook page for the store 12/9/13 inquiring about our product. She told me our order was mailed out late October 2013 and she would contact USPS and if she had to then resend another order and call me to verify my address. I left my address on her facebook page and still have not heard from her as of DECEMBER 14, 2013 !! I filled out a complaint online to the Better Business Bureau. I received a confirmation email from BBB stating she has until January 17, 2014 to respond to this complaint. I read Several complaints on her facebook page about the poor or lack of customer service on prepaid orders, especially online orders never being fulfilled, customers never being contacted on their orders. Stacey's response to one lady was "We are a small Mom and Pop shop...." WOW ! Really! I think it's ridiculous that she continues to have Big sales events, free make and takes every weekend, and people are prepaying for orders either in her store or online and yet we all sit here and wait for our PREPAID merchandise !!! Doesn't matter if a store is big or small...Customer's shouldn't have to wait over 3 months to receive something they already paid for and not one person from her store contact the customer!!!
Jump up ^ Sensational Page Ideas for Scrapbooks. Cincinnati, OH: Memory Makers. 2004. p. 31. ISBN 1-892127-49-0. Your hands should be clean and oil free when handling photographs and documents. Oil and dirt can rub off your fingers and onto the documents and photos causing damage and deterioration. Using a pair of inexpensive photography cotton gloves will help keep oily fingerprints from causing long-term damage.
Marielen Wadley Christensen (pronounced as the names "Mary Ellen"), of Elk Ridge, Utah, United States (formerly of Spanish Fork, Utah) is credited with turning scrapbooking from what was once just the ages-old hobby into the actual industry containing businesses devoted specifically to the manufacturing and sale of scrapbooking supplies. She began designing creative pages for her family's photo memories, inserting the completed pages into sheet protectors collected in 3-ring binders. By 1980, she had assembled over fifty volumes and was invited to display them at the World Conference on Records in Salt Lake City. In 1981 Marielen and her husband Anthony Jay ("A.J.") authored and published a how-to booklet, Keeping Memories Alive, and opened a scrapbook store in Spanish Fork that ended up with the same name, that remains open today.[11][12]

One of the key components of modern scrapbooking is the archival quality of the supplies. Designed to preserve photographs and journaling in their original state, materials encouraged by most serious scrapbookers are of a higher quality than those of many typical photo albums commercially available. Scrappers insist on acid-free, lignin-free papers, stamp ink, and embossing powder. They also use pigment-based inks, which are fade resistant, colorfast, and often waterproof. Many scrappers use buffered paper, which will protect photos from acid in memorabilia used in the scrapbook. Older "magnetic" albums are not acid-free and thus cause damage to the photos and memorabilia included in them. Gloves, too, are used to protect photos from the oil on hands.[23]
This is a great book for scrapbookers. It has many ideas on scrapbook pages for people who have a lot of time and those who just have a little time. It also gives ideas on how to use color, handwriting and fonts, how to sort and store your stuff, and how to make digital pages. I found it very useful to get ideas and thought it was organized well and easy to use.

The advent of modern photography began with the first permanent photograph created by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce in 1826.[7] This allowed the average person to begin to incorporate photographs into their scrapbooks. However, books or albums made specifically for showcasing photographs alone were not popularized in the United States until closer to 1860. Before that point, photographs were not thought of as items to be reproduced and shared. Demand for photo albums was spurred on in large part by the growing popularity of the carte de visite, a small photograph distributed in the same manner one might a visiting card.[6]
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