In addition to the collection of photographs, tickets, postcards, and other memorabilia, journaling is often a principal element in modern scrapbooks. Journaling is text that describes, explains, or accents the photographs on a scrapbook page. Contemporary journaling can take many forms. It can be reflective and story-like, take a reportive tone, or simply be a list of words. Journaling may also include song lyrics, quotations, and poems. The value of journaling lies in the fact that it provides an account of family histories that may otherwise not be preserved.

Cardstock is the firm paper onto which you’ll glue your photos and embellishments. Typically, it's more flexible than paperboard, but stiffer than standard paper. You can find cardstock in a wide range of solid colours, patterns and textures, so it's easy to choose a look that matches your theme. Consider solid-colour cardstock if you plan on tearing pages for effect and don't want to expose an unattractive white core. Look for acid and lignin-free cardstock for decorated pages that will resist fading and discolouring over time.
Next, simply replace each template on your layout with the completed paper element. It is hard to describe the sense of satisfaction that comes as you watch your design spring to life before your eyes! And the best part is that it will look exactly like you thought it would every time, if not better! The end result will be an inexpensive, beautiful layout that will bring an added sense of creative fulfillment to your day!
Fabulous store! They carry a ton of products; dies, stamps, paper, ribbon, gelatos , copics, watercolors, etc. if you need it they probably have it. The store is laid out very well and each product displayed well. Some are grouped well together in project ideas. The staff is extremely knowledgeable, kind and helpful. The products are priced very well.  Parking is pretty easy but the parking lot does have a bit of seedy element to it.
Please do NOT purchase anything online or order in the store or you may wait over 3 months like me to receive your PAID product!!! A friend and I went to this store in August 2013 and I ordered a $ 9 stamp set and she ordered a Halloween die for less then $10. The store sale was 20% off entire store. My friend grabbed the last stamp "My Favorite Things a la modes Fight like a Girl" and so I paid for it and Stacey said she would still give us the 20% off and ship both our orders to us free since they were out of stock on these items. I gave her my address to mail both items to save her shipping costs. A couple of months went by and I contacted Stacey on her facebook page for the store 12/9/13 inquiring about our product. She told me our order was mailed out late October 2013 and she would contact USPS and if she had to then resend another order and call me to verify my address. I left my address on her facebook page and still have not heard from her as of DECEMBER 14, 2013 !! I filled out a complaint online to the Better Business Bureau. I received a confirmation email from BBB stating she has until January 17, 2014 to respond to this complaint. I read Several complaints on her facebook page about the poor or lack of customer service on prepaid orders, especially online orders never being fulfilled, customers never being contacted on their orders. Stacey's response to one lady was "We are a small Mom and Pop shop...." WOW ! Really! I think it's ridiculous that she continues to have Big sales events, free make and takes every weekend, and people are prepaying for orders either in her store or online and yet we all sit here and wait for our PREPAID merchandise !!! Doesn't matter if a store is big or small...Customer's shouldn't have to wait over 3 months to receive something they already paid for and not one person from her store contact the customer!!!
The advent of scanners, desktop publishing, page layout programs, and advanced printing options make it relatively easy to create professional-looking layouts in digital form. The internet allows scrapbookers to self-publish their work. Scrapbooks that exist completely in digital image form are referred to as "digital scrapbooks" or "computer scrapbooks".[24]
During the 19th century, scrapbooking was seen as a more involved way to preserve one’s experiences than journaling or other writing-based forms of logging. Printed material such as cheap newspapers, visiting cards, playbills, and pamphlets circulated widely during the 19th century and often became the primary components of peoples’ scrapbooks.[5] The growing volume of ephemera of this kind, parallel to the growth of industrialized society, created a demand for methods of cataloguing and preserving them. This is why scrapbooks devoted solely to cataloguing recipes, coupons, or other lists were also common during this time. Until later in the 19th century, scrapbooks were seen as functional as well as aesthetically pleasing.[6] Several factors, including marketing strategies and technological advancement, contributed to the image of scrapbooking moving further toward the aesthetic plane over the years.
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