Your scrapbook album is where you'll arrange and store your decorated memories. Choose an album that's an appropriate size and has the right number of pages for the project you're undertaking. The three basic album sizes are 8” x 8”, 8” x 11” and 12” x 12.” Albums are sold in a variety of colors, patterns and materials. Be sure to choose a durable material that will last as long as the items inside. 
Get ready to ohhhhhh and ahhhhhhh over the NEW collection of products from Studio Light! You bet your bottom dollar...they are HERE!!! And the price...seriously...the price is beyond holy smokes artichokes!!! I am so very excited to have these new goodies that pair up perfectly with the next NEW 12 colors of I Zink Diamond Glitter!!!! Studio Light is from the Netherlands and Aladine is from France, so it is an international whaoooo kachoooo You Tube this week!
So, here it is, once again, my shout out to those of you in sunny California. This weekend, pass up coming to SMS. Instead, take your crafty budget, regardless of if it is big or small, and make the trip to see Wooten's Scrapbook Store. They are having a wonderful SALE along with selling off their fixtures! And, who doesn't need storage for all of your stash.
I love this store.  The employees and the owner are friendly.  And they have the widest selection of product across many companies I have ever seen.  If they are out, they will order it for you.  Yes online orders do take a while, but you have to understand, they are a mom and pop store that gets so many orders, it is impossible for them to get the orders out as timely as many people would like.  Especially if you order during their super busy times of the year like Shop Hop, Sizzix warehouse sale, Spellbinders warehouse sale, and CHA.  If you need something sooner, go to the store and buy it.  If you can wait and don't need it any time soon, but want it, then place and order.
A couple of months went by and I contacted Stacey on her facebook page for the store 12/9/13 inquiring about our product.  She told me our order was mailed out late October 2013 and she would contact USPS and if she had to then resend another order and call me to verify my address.  I left my address on her facebook page and still have not heard from her as of DECEMBER 14, 2013 !!
First and foremost, begin the process by selecting photos on the theme, idea, or event you’ve decided to work on. Perhaps you want to showcase a certain vacation or your child’s first birthday celebration. Or maybe you want to create a scrapbook for a friend or family member. During the creation process, plan on using your photos as a narration of the theme.
In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.
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