Are you spending too much time or money on your layouts? Do you feel uninspired or uncreative? Whether you are new to scrapbooking or a long-time veteran, these obstacles can be the source of unending frustration! We believe that the key to finding joy in the journey from concept to completion is simplicity. We’d like to introduce you to a system that utilizes the power of simplicity to overcome the most common frustrations that we face as scrapbookers, regardless of our level of expertise.
Scrapbooking is one of the largest categories within the craft and hobby industry and now considered[by whom?] to be the third most popular craft in the nation. From 1996 through 2004, sales of scrapbooking products increased across the United States. In 2005, annual sales flattened for the first time after many back to back years of double growth. From 2006 through 2010 traditional scrapbooking sales have declined, while digital forms of scrapbooking have grown. Traditional scrapbooking sales for 2010 have declined to about $1.6 billion in annual sales from a peak of about $2.5 billion in 2005.[28]
First and foremost…We love paper! Everyone on the Kiwi team is a self-proclaimed paper addict! And what’s not to love? The colors, patterns and textures available in our paper stashes are a treasure trove of creative potential, and it turns out that they are also a big part of the solution to those frustrations we mentioned earlier! Paper is the perfect way to dress up any layout with layer upon layer of color and texture. Using our paper properly will result in scrapbooks that look like a million bucks, without actually costing us an arm and a leg! But how to go about tapping into this resource? Well, that’s where our Designer Templates come in!

The first step in the Play-to-Create system is to design our layout. Coming up with a design idea that you can be confident about can be the hardest step in the scrapbooking process. Too often we will stare at our materials for hours, trying to will an idea into existence, or we will surf endlessly on the internet trying to find some inspiration. We may resort to sketching something out on a piece of paper, but the end result is never quite what we imagined it would be.


For example, college women around the turn of the century used scrapbooks extensively to construct representations of their everyday life as students. Without photograph albums to provide images of these life events, students created unique representations through scrapbooks in order to illustrate their lives using ephemera and memorabilia. A guest list or group of visiting cards might represent a young woman’s visit to a party. A playbill and ticket stub might serve as reminders of a trip to New York to see a Broadway show. Solid objects such as plants, silverware, or small trinkets were also used when further visual representation was needed.
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