Once you’ve successfully picked the photos, the next step involves selecting a patterned paper for your background, which will not only add color to the page, but also depth. By using patterned paper, you’ll be able to mirror the story that you are trying to tell with photos. Depending on the theme, look, and style, you may be able to find themed papers that will suit your every need. All in all, when selecting the patterned paper, you should select a pattern that enhances your theme.
Do not judge a book by it's cover is exactly what I thought when I pushed open the doors to this shop yesterday! It's in a pretty old strip mall with a ridiculous parking situation and tucked back in the corner, but what a very nice surprise indeed! Clean, well stocked with plenty of employees all asking if they can be of service makes for an enjoyable shopping experience.
The advent of modern photography began with the first permanent photograph created by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce in 1826.[7] This allowed the average person to begin to incorporate photographs into their scrapbooks. However, books or albums made specifically for showcasing photographs alone were not popularized in the United States until closer to 1860. Before that point, photographs were not thought of as items to be reproduced and shared. Demand for photo albums was spurred on in large part by the growing popularity of the carte de visite, a small photograph distributed in the same manner one might a visiting card.[6]

First and foremost…We love paper! Everyone on the Kiwi team is a self-proclaimed paper addict! And what’s not to love? The colors, patterns and textures available in our paper stashes are a treasure trove of creative potential, and it turns out that they are also a big part of the solution to those frustrations we mentioned earlier! Paper is the perfect way to dress up any layout with layer upon layer of color and texture. Using our paper properly will result in scrapbooks that look like a million bucks, without actually costing us an arm and a leg! But how to go about tapping into this resource? Well, that’s where our Designer Templates come in!


A couple of months went by and I contacted Stacey on her facebook page for the store 12/9/13 inquiring about our product.  She told me our order was mailed out late October 2013 and she would contact USPS and if she had to then resend another order and call me to verify my address.  I left my address on her facebook page and still have not heard from her as of DECEMBER 14, 2013 !!
According to Google Trends, the search terms related to scrapbook and scrapbooking have seen a 70 percent decline since its peak in 2005-2006.[20] However, there is much debate among the community of people who engage in memory keeping about what the decline means for the health and future of the industry as a whole. What seems to be clear is that traditional scrapbooking is once again in a transition period due to many forces including current economic issues, the influence of social media and the ease of digital sharing, and the rejection of the stereotype of traditional scrapbooks being something that is for older women. However, if one takes a closer look, it is easy to see all the ways people continue memory keeping even if it doesn't fall strictly within the definition of traditional scrapbooking as defined here.
Page protectors help keep your decorated pages safe from harm, including the damage caused oily fingers, pages sticking together and general wear and tear. Choose between glossy or non-glare protectors, depending on your preference. Even if your cardstock is acid and lignin-free, you should still use non-vinyl and archival-safe page protectors to prevent damage and potential fading. Be sure to buy page protectors that match the size of your album. 
An international standard, ISO 18902, provides specific guidelines on materials that are safe for scrapbooking through its requirements for albums, framing, and storage materials. ISO 18902 includes requirements for photo-safety and a specific pH range for acid-free materials. ISO 18902 prohibits the use of harmful materials, including Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and Cellulose nitrate.
The following photographs show some of the pages from a "Memorial of Friendship" scrapbook kept by Anne Wagner, a British woman, between 1795 and 1834. She belonged to the same social circle as the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley. Anne Wagner's scrapbook includes pages she created, as well as contributions from friends and relatives. The scrapbook contains handwritten poems, notes left by friends and relatives, and decoupage ephemera like locks of hair, decorative paper clippings, ribbons, and detailed watercolour sketches.
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