Following the lead of Keeping Memories Alive (which was originally in the smaller building next door and named The Annex in its early years), many other stores have popped up and cater to the scrapbooking community. These shops provide many of the necessary tools for every scrapbooker's needs. Besides Keeping Memories Alive, these include companies such as Creative Memories, Making Memories, Stampin' Up!, and Close to My Heart.
Marielen Wadley Christensen (pronounced as the names "Mary Ellen"), of Elk Ridge, Utah, United States (formerly of Spanish Fork, Utah) is credited with turning scrapbooking from what was once just the ages-old hobby into the actual industry containing businesses devoted specifically to the manufacturing and sale of scrapbooking supplies. She began designing creative pages for her family's photo memories, inserting the completed pages into sheet protectors collected in 3-ring binders. By 1980, she had assembled over fifty volumes and was invited to display them at the World Conference on Records in Salt Lake City. In 1981 Marielen and her husband Anthony Jay ("A.J.") authored and published a how-to booklet, Keeping Memories Alive, and opened a scrapbook store in Spanish Fork that ended up with the same name, that remains open today.[11][12]
Then, we add in the latest 12 colors of I... Zink Diamond Glitter by Aladine and you have a WINNER WINNER CHICKEN DINNER. Yep, this is the glitter that needs no glue and drys in a snap. Seriously, in most cases it dries in under a minute. No more leaving your projects to dry over night or worse yet....smudging them when you accidentally touch them!!!
The scrapbooking industry doubled in size between 2001 and 2004 to $2.5 billion[17] with over 1,600 companies creating scrapbooking products by 2003. Creative Memories, a home-based retailer of scrapbooking supplies founded in 1987, saw $425 million in retail sales in 2004.[18] Creative Memories' parent company did file Chapter 11 in 2013 and became the bankruptcy with the largest debt in the Twin City area.[19]

I gave this 3 stars because I've got mixed opinions. One, i have two things on order since the 18th of September 2017. It is now going into week 4, and still haven't gotten the order. (Do they have favorite customers and tend to them first? Hmmmm.) When I emailed, I get a reply saying that they are behind on their orders and stuff like that. It's two Stamping Bella stamp sets and they don't carry this brand any where else, except of course the actual company. I am so used to my orders coming within days to, at most, a week or two, but this is way too long. I'm not too far away from the store, but they don't have these particular stamps in their store. :-/ Two, on the other side of the coin, I've also been in their store! How neat and clean it is! And the people there are oh so friendly, too. And this is the first store I've gone to that has the LAWN FAWN products! And they sell the stamps and dies as a bundle! Don't know if that is a good or bad thing, tho. I actually just got started into rubber stamping and die cutting and stuff. (I have had a Sizzix Big Kick machine for years, and haven't used it much. Finding out that these die cuts that are available with some stamps work with this machine, got me into using it again!) You see, I do cross stitch. But the magazines I get from the bookstore comes from the uk. And two magazines went out of production, so there aren't many cross stitch designs for cards, anymore. So i thought i would try cross stitching designs with rubber stamping (cling/clear, whatever you call it) combined! I got a little claustrophobic once when I went on a Saturday, (although my doctor called it an anxiety attack, when the same symptoms occured a couple years ago where I used to work!) so i avoid going on Saturdays. I found out it was probably coupon day or the anniversary sale or something when I went, so oh well, no coupons for me. Avoiding saturdays there from now on, might be a good idea for me. Also, also on a good note, I've seen a few of Stacey's videos and have learned some things. For instance, now i know the difference between a Sizzix Big Kick and a Sizzix Big Shot! And now i know why I don't see the Big Shot in Joann's or Michael's! (I hear more of the Big Shot than the Big Kick, so I wanted to find out the difference between them.) Anyway, thanks for what you do in the store. Wish your shipping could be a little better, though. Thats why the loss of two stars.
In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.
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