They curently do not charge your credit card until it is being packaged for shipping.  They don't hide anything.  "it ships when it ships."  They announce this all the time, especially when they are coming up to their busy times of year.  I can't imagine how many orders they get during her big event times of the year mentioned above.  Must be in the thousands.
Waterproof and fade-proof pens for journaling will keep your scrapbook timeless. Pencils are handy for sketching out custom fonts or for marking borders when you may need to erase your work. Try adding your own comments or doodles with coloured pens ranging from fat to skinny tip. If you can’t decide which colour will match with your theme, a classic black ink pen is always a good choice. Handwritten notes detailing facts like dates, locations, and moods are an easy way to personalize your journal and make your entries more memorable and meaningful. 
A friend and I went to this store in August 2013 and I ordered a $ 9 stamp set and she ordered a Halloween die for less then $10.  The store sale was 20% off entire store. My friend grabbed the last stamp "My Favorite Things a la modes Fight like a Girl" and so I paid for it and Stacey said she would still give us the 20% off and ship both our orders to us free since they were out of stock on these items.  I gave her my address to mail both items to save her shipping costs.
In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.
×