Basic materials include background papers (including printed and cardstock paper), photo corner mounts (or other means of mounting photos such as adhesive dots, photo mounting tape, or acid-free glue), scissors, a paper trimmer or cutting tool, art pens, archival pens for journaling, and mounting glues (like thermo-tac). More elaborate designs require more specialized tools such as die cut templates, rubber stamps, craft punches, stencils, inking tools, eyelet setters, heat embossing tools and personal die cut machines. A lot of time people who enjoy scrapbooking will create their own background papers by using the tools mentioned along with "fancy" textured scissors.
Below are ...just a few of the samples that will be shown in this week's Saturday With Stacey You Tube Class #269! And, for your chance to be a WINNER WINNER CHICKEN DINNER Peep what do you have to post? Well, both Studio Light B.V and Aladine are international companies and need some well wishes from their friends across the pond (that would be YOU!) Click their name that is BLUE in this post to visit their site and somewhere....anywhere you can find...post that Scrapbooking Made Simple Peep's LOVE, LOVE, LOVE their products! Then, come back here and tell me that you posted on one or both!
Fabulous store! They carry a ton of products; dies, stamps, paper, ribbon, gelatos , copics, watercolors, etc. if you need it they probably have it. The store is laid out very well and each product displayed well. Some are grouped well together in project ideas. The staff is extremely knowledgeable, kind and helpful. The products are priced very well. Parking is pretty easy but the parking lot does have a bit of seedy element to it. If you can't attend a free Saturday class, the owner, Stacy, has instructional videos on you tube.

Basic materials include background papers (including printed and cardstock paper), photo corner mounts (or other means of mounting photos such as adhesive dots, photo mounting tape, or acid-free glue), scissors, a paper trimmer or cutting tool, art pens, archival pens for journaling, and mounting glues (like thermo-tac). More elaborate designs require more specialized tools such as die cut templates, rubber stamps, craft punches, stencils, inking tools, eyelet setters, heat embossing tools and personal die cut machines. A lot of time people who enjoy scrapbooking will create their own background papers by using the tools mentioned along with "fancy" textured scissors.
Scrapbookers will sometimes refer to sketches for inspiration for their pages.[citation needed] Sketches are a hand-drawn layout showing where to position photos, titles, journaling and embellishments. It gives novice scrapbookers somewhere to begin if they are not experienced with balancing the layout correctly. Scrapbookers can interpret the sketch in any way they choose; it is a great starting point when you have scrappers-block. There have been many sketchbooks published and scrapbooking magazines always offer sketches as part of their content.[original research?]
Following the lead of Keeping Memories Alive (which was originally in the smaller building next door and named The Annex in its early years), many other stores have popped up and cater to the scrapbooking community. These shops provide many of the necessary tools for every scrapbooker's needs. Besides Keeping Memories Alive, these include companies such as Creative Memories, Making Memories, Stampin' Up!, and Close to My Heart.
I have two orders pending with this company. One placed 6/3/17 and the next placed 7/8/17. Both show "awaiting fulfillment ". When I emailed asking the status I got a reply stating they are behind and I can call and cancel the order if I wish. I want the supplies so I won't cancel YET!! My credit card has been charged for both orders. I can assure you I will NOT order from this company again. Even though their prices may be slightly lower than other companies waiting this long for delivery takes away the advantage of the lower prices. Over all I am EXTREMELY Disappointed.
With their new site, customers now have the option to pay with paypal when it comes time for your order to be packaged.  If you need something now and can't get to the store, order it elsewhere.  I hate to send business away from such a great store and such wonderful people, but it is what it is.  I only order online what I don't need right away, can't get to the store, and/or when I want to take advantage of the amazing deals they have that you can't get anywhere else.  They also carry product you can't get anywhere else at times.  I am fortunate enough to be close enough to make the trip to her store when I need to most of the time.
Take free video classes from top teachers and designers. Learn how to make beautiful cards, meaningful scrapbook layouts, and other handmade projects. Explore everything from beginning stamping to advanced die cutting and everything else you can imagine. Other sites charge $20 to $40 for similar classes, but Scrapbook.com offers these lessons at no cost.

Basic materials include background papers (including printed and cardstock paper), photo corner mounts (or other means of mounting photos such as adhesive dots, photo mounting tape, or acid-free glue), scissors, a paper trimmer or cutting tool, art pens, archival pens for journaling, and mounting glues (like thermo-tac). More elaborate designs require more specialized tools such as die cut templates, rubber stamps, craft punches, stencils, inking tools, eyelet setters, heat embossing tools and personal die cut machines. A lot of time people who enjoy scrapbooking will create their own background papers by using the tools mentioned along with "fancy" textured scissors.


The advent of modern photography began with the first permanent photograph created by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce in 1826.[7] This allowed the average person to begin to incorporate photographs into their scrapbooks. However, books or albums made specifically for showcasing photographs alone were not popularized in the United States until closer to 1860. Before that point, photographs were not thought of as items to be reproduced and shared. Demand for photo albums was spurred on in large part by the growing popularity of the carte de visite, a small photograph distributed in the same manner one might a visiting card.[6]
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