Because I can't figure out how to edit my 10/15/14 review: My mid-July order arrived in November-- just short of FOUR MONTHS. I stay by my review, and agree with the reviewer that you shouldn't order something you need for a specific purpose or by a specific date. I ordered things for Halloween and fall craft fairs (thinking no guaranteed shipping would still get it to me in, say, two months) and ended up having to order a couple of things elsewhere! I will need to ebay the duplicates. Any savings I had disappeared. This store has the latest and greatest, but by the time you get it.... the stuff is no longer the "latest!" I will continue to visit when possible, but I will order elsewhere.
The scrapbooking industry doubled in size between 2001 and 2004 to $2.5 billion[17] with over 1,600 companies creating scrapbooking products by 2003. Creative Memories, a home-based retailer of scrapbooking supplies founded in 1987, saw $425 million in retail sales in 2004.[18] Creative Memories' parent company did file Chapter 11 in 2013 and became the bankruptcy with the largest debt in the Twin City area.[19]
During the 19th century, scrapbooking was seen as a more involved way to preserve one’s experiences than journaling or other writing-based forms of logging. Printed material such as cheap newspapers, visiting cards, playbills, and pamphlets circulated widely during the 19th century and often became the primary components of peoples’ scrapbooks.[5] The growing volume of ephemera of this kind, parallel to the growth of industrialized society, created a demand for methods of cataloguing and preserving them. This is why scrapbooks devoted solely to cataloguing recipes, coupons, or other lists were also common during this time. Until later in the 19th century, scrapbooks were seen as functional as well as aesthetically pleasing.[6] Several factors, including marketing strategies and technological advancement, contributed to the image of scrapbooking moving further toward the aesthetic plane over the years.
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