I have been buying from Stacey since I found her about three years ago. I love her video classes and she is so real you can't help but love her. The only reason I didn't give this review 5 stars is because of the shipping times. Yes!!! She means it ship when it ships. She tells you up front so don't grow impatient. You will get your stuff and you will be happy with it. I ordered from the last big sale (July 16, 2016) and still haven't gotten my product. The thing is....you can't get the SMS products anywhere else. Her products are exclusive and really good and the prices are fair. She tries to give you as much for your money as she possibly can. She really cares. I have never been to the store (it is on my bucket list) but I have learned so much from her. All I can say is that the SMS products are yummy and she is so cute and the SMS team is doing the best they can. Have some patience - it's hard I know but it will be well worth it!
K&COMPANY-SMASH Blue Folio Bundle. This kit is a packed full of fun items and will help you get a jump on creating your first SMASH project. This package contains one 8x10 inch folio with photo sleeves, one SMASHstick pen and glue, one elastic pen band, seventy sticky notes, one list pad, one wallet folio, two paper clips, eight sticker strips, one roll of tape, one resealable decorative bag. Imported.

2.5 stars. Generally, the examples are way too busy for my tastes (I think they are trying to sell more products.) Good basic ideas and layouts for beginners. Offers lots of encouragement. Covers everything from fonts to cropping to creating your work space to embellishments to album ideas. As a long time scrapbooker, I found it was NOT made easy, simply because there was so much in it.
So, here it is, once again, my shout out to those of you in sunny California. This weekend, pass up coming to SMS. Instead, take your crafty budget, regardless of if it is big or small, and make the trip to see Wooten's Scrapbook Store. They are having a wonderful SALE along with selling off their fixtures! And, who doesn't need storage for all of your stash.
Marielen Wadley Christensen (pronounced as the names "Mary Ellen"), of Elk Ridge, Utah, United States (formerly of Spanish Fork, Utah) is credited with turning scrapbooking from what was once just the ages-old hobby into the actual industry containing businesses devoted specifically to the manufacturing and sale of scrapbooking supplies. She began designing creative pages for her family's photo memories, inserting the completed pages into sheet protectors collected in 3-ring binders. By 1980, she had assembled over fifty volumes and was invited to display them at the World Conference on Records in Salt Lake City. In 1981 Marielen and her husband Anthony Jay ("A.J.") authored and published a how-to booklet, Keeping Memories Alive, and opened a scrapbook store in Spanish Fork that ended up with the same name, that remains open today.[11][12]
After you have glued the photo to the matting paper, then cut the other two sides so that you end up with a frame around the photos. An ideal mat will provide a visual space between the paper and the photo, regardless as to whether you’re using a solid color or not. When selecting the color of the mat, you should first consider the dominant color together with the minor colors in the background.

According to Google Trends, the search terms related to scrapbook and scrapbooking have seen a 70 percent decline since its peak in 2005-2006.[20] However, there is much debate among the community of people who engage in memory keeping about what the decline means for the health and future of the industry as a whole. What seems to be clear is that traditional scrapbooking is once again in a transition period due to many forces including current economic issues, the influence of social media and the ease of digital sharing, and the rejection of the stereotype of traditional scrapbooks being something that is for older women. However, if one takes a closer look, it is easy to see all the ways people continue memory keeping even if it doesn't fall strictly within the definition of traditional scrapbooking as defined here.
A scrapbooking, card makers and crafters dream. We do day, weekend and weekday crops and retreats. Our studio is set up for scrapbooking, card making and all kinds of crafting, as well as classes and crops. The studio has amazing natural light, plus we have installed LED lights above work stations, and have even added Ott Lites to each work station.  Each station also comes with a self healing magnetic mat and a basket with some essential tool. The studio is setup with all the latest tools and toys to play with. The building has WIFI for your use will you visit as well.

Cardstock is the firm paper onto which you’ll glue your photos and embellishments. Typically, it's more flexible than paperboard, but stiffer than standard paper. You can find cardstock in a wide range of solid colours, patterns and textures, so it's easy to choose a look that matches your theme. Consider solid-colour cardstock if you plan on tearing pages for effect and don't want to expose an unattractive white core. Look for acid and lignin-free cardstock for decorated pages that will resist fading and discolouring over time.
Jump up ^ Strauss, Robert (2001-09-16). "Getting the Hang of Hanging Out". The New York Times. Retrieved 2007-11-04. From 5 to 10 p.m. on those nights, at least a dozen women gather at the tables in the back room. For $5, the store buys them pizza and soda and they get use of the cutting materials and, of course, buy other stuff. You bring your photos and you get scrapbooking ideas.
My wife goes to SMS quite literally all the time so I suppose you could say I go here all the time. I am not a scrapbook aficionado because I am quite literally "artistically challenged." I own it, I admit it, I don't try to pretend I'm anything I'm not. However, having been in this store as many times as I have with my wife, I feel the need to elaborate more specifically on the things the spouses of scrapbooking people might enjoy:
During the 19th century, scrapbooking was seen as a more involved way to preserve one’s experiences than journaling or other writing-based forms of logging. Printed material such as cheap newspapers, visiting cards, playbills, and pamphlets circulated widely during the 19th century and often became the primary components of peoples’ scrapbooks.[5] The growing volume of ephemera of this kind, parallel to the growth of industrialized society, created a demand for methods of cataloguing and preserving them. This is why scrapbooks devoted solely to cataloguing recipes, coupons, or other lists were also common during this time. Until later in the 19th century, scrapbooks were seen as functional as well as aesthetically pleasing.[6] Several factors, including marketing strategies and technological advancement, contributed to the image of scrapbooking moving further toward the aesthetic plane over the years.
×