Old scrapbooks tended to have photos mounted with photomounting corners and perhaps notations of who was in a photo or where and when it was taken. They often included bits of memorabilia like newspaper clippings, letters, etc. An early known American scrapbooker and inventor of scrapbooking supplies was Mark Twain. Twain carried scrapbooks on his travels as he collected souvenirs, clippings and pictures.[8][9][10]
Fabulous store! They carry a ton of products; dies, stamps, paper, ribbon, gelatos , copics, watercolors, etc. if you need it they probably have it. The store is laid out very well and each product displayed well. Some are grouped well together in project ideas. The staff is extremely knowledgeable, kind and helpful. The products are priced very well. Parking is pretty easy but the parking lot does have a bit of seedy element to it. If you can't attend a free Saturday class, the owner, Stacy, has instructional videos on you tube.

My wife goes to SMS quite literally all the time so I suppose you could say I go here all the time. I am not a scrapbook aficionado because I am quite literally "artistically challenged." I own it, I admit it, I don't try to pretend I'm anything I'm not. However, having been in this store as many times as I have with my wife, I feel the need to elaborate more specifically on the things the spouses of scrapbooking people might enjoy:

This is a really cute store with everything you need for cards and scrapbooking. I came here for their "garage sale" and bought wonderful things for unbelievable prices. Their normal items are at reasonable also. BUT...if you order anything online it takes a very long to receive, regardless of "shop that didn't hop" sales. I've been waiting 10 weeks and they still cannot give me a delivery time of my products, some items are in stock but will be delivered with the "close out" items. Very disappointing.


The advent of modern photography began with the first permanent photograph created by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce in 1826.[7] This allowed the average person to begin to incorporate photographs into their scrapbooks. However, books or albums made specifically for showcasing photographs alone were not popularized in the United States until closer to 1860. Before that point, photographs were not thought of as items to be reproduced and shared. Demand for photo albums was spurred on in large part by the growing popularity of the carte de visite, a small photograph distributed in the same manner one might a visiting card.[6]
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