Scrapbooking crops (or "Crops") are events where 2 or more scrapbookers gather to work in a social circle on their books, cards or other projects. It is similar to the old quilting bees that used to be socially prevalent, but has been replaced by today's "Crop". Attendees bring specific supplies themselves to work on said projects and sometimes there are vendors at these events to purchase any extra scrapbooking needs. At these events ideas are shared, techniques are taught to one another, products used (e.g. cutting machines such as, Silhouette & Cricut) are learned about and attendees have a few hours to days of uninterrupted time to work on their scrapbooks, cards, or any project they are needing to accomplish. Events are planned informally at one's home, a church hall or establishments with meeting rooms to the larger attended crops that encompass days of time in a hotel, where the attendee stays in the same hotel and works in the large ballroom or conference rooms in the hotel with tens to hundreds of attendees. Some of the ways to learn about events are mainly through word of mouth, social media and community postings.
Yes lots of product but don't be in a hurry for orders. I received order today of order placed ONE YEAR AGO on July 18, 2016. And it wasn't complete because one item had been "discontinued". I don't believe it for a minute. If been asking and asking and was told it ships when it ships. I asked again on 17th and low and behold they found only part of my order in the sinkhole of orders. Might have lots of good product but if going to have sales be sure to have staff to ship orders before you start yet ANOTHER sale.

One of the key components of modern scrapbooking is the archival quality of the supplies. Designed to preserve photographs and journaling in their original state, materials encouraged by most serious scrapbookers are of a higher quality than those of many typical photo albums commercially available. Scrappers insist on acid-free, lignin-free papers, stamp ink, and embossing powder. They also use pigment-based inks, which are fade resistant, colorfast, and often waterproof. Many scrappers use buffered paper, which will protect photos from acid in memorabilia used in the scrapbook. Older "magnetic" albums are not acid-free and thus cause damage to the photos and memorabilia included in them. Gloves, too, are used to protect photos from the oil on hands.[23]

This book was created by the makers of the Simple Scrapbooks magazine. It's a great resource for people who want to create simple and contemporary scrapbooks. It's well organized and has all kinds of great tips for a beginner scrapbooker and examples to inspire advanced scrapbookers. There are plenty of ideas for scrapbook albums, layouts, journaling, use of colors and patterns, etc. Probably the best scrapbooking book I've read so far.
A scrapbooking, card makers and crafters dream. We do day, weekend and weekday crops and retreats. Our studio is set up for scrapbooking, card making and all kinds of crafting, as well as classes and crops. The studio has amazing natural light, plus we have installed LED lights above work stations, and have even added Ott Lites to each work station.  Each station also comes with a self healing magnetic mat and a basket with some essential tool. The studio is setup with all the latest tools and toys to play with. The building has WIFI for your use will you visit as well.
Hi there! I am Stacey, owner of Scrapbooking Made Simple, a retail and online store! Every Saturday, we bring you a You Tube Class Called "Saturday's With Stacey"! These classes are all about using what you may already own, showing you new products all while keeping this great hobby affordable! So, please subscribe to our channel and welcome to Scrapbooking Made Simple!
The scrapbooking industry doubled in size between 2001 and 2004 to $2.5 billion[17] with over 1,600 companies creating scrapbooking products by 2003. Creative Memories, a home-based retailer of scrapbooking supplies founded in 1987, saw $425 million in retail sales in 2004.[18] Creative Memories' parent company did file Chapter 11 in 2013 and became the bankruptcy with the largest debt in the Twin City area.[19]
 A NEW manufacturer comes to Scrapbooking Made Simple today! Let's all welcome Studio Light and their incredibly affordable decoupage books. When I say "bang for your buck", I mean it when it comes to this products. It is all stunning. It is all easy to use. It allows you to keep things simple or BAM...take them up a notch! It really is a wonderful product for all types of crafters!

The Scrapping Bug is firmly committed to our mission statement and will continue to strive to fulfill and indeed surpass these objectives in our efforts to earn your valued business. It is our ongoing commitment at The Scrapping Bug to assist you in your desire to expand your scrapbook skills, make available the latest and most up to date products in the industry and keep your purchase price the most competitive in the market place.
In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.
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