Warnings: It can get very crowded, especially when there is a sale--maybe not Costco proportions but crowded nonetheless. They have multiple registers open, and they're pretty efficient about getting people checked out. Cell service can be very spotty in the store. That's not a SMS problem but just be warned that you may not be able to make/receive calls reliably while you're in the store.
With their new site, customers now have the option to pay with paypal when it comes time for your order to be packaged.  If you need something now and can't get to the store, order it elsewhere.  I hate to send business away from such a great store and such wonderful people, but it is what it is.  I only order online what I don't need right away, can't get to the store, and/or when I want to take advantage of the amazing deals they have that you can't get anywhere else.  They also carry product you can't get anywhere else at times.  I am fortunate enough to be close enough to make the trip to her store when I need to most of the time.
Adhesives are literally the glue that keeps your project together. Your options include glue sticks, tape runner, rubber cement, and glue dots. Rubber cement is recommended for bulky, uneven decorations that standard glue can’t quite stick. Non-permanent adhesives are helpful for readjusting photos or patterned paper. For inevitable mistakes, thankfully there’s adhesive remover. Using quality, archival-safe glues will help your masterpiece stay together for years to come. 

Instant cameras and film are ridiculously fun, creative ways for making and sharing memories. Paste them into books, with as much or as little text as you desire, or pick a wall in your home/office to create a personalized art installation. They can be used to make a baby book or be more travel-centric. Also, whether you have a classic Polaroid or a new Instax, they are so easy to use, that your kids can have their own roll of film to capture memories of their own. Photo strips from photo booths work great, too!

Welcome to Paper Wishes® Scrapbooking 101 – your guide to the basics of scrapbooking! Whether you are brand new to scrapbooking, or are just looking to master the basics, Scrapbooking 101 has all the information you need to get started creating your own scrapbook pages and albums! Scrapbooking 101 provides information about commonly used scrapbooking supplies, including adhesives and paper cutting tools. Scrapbooking 101 also has articles covering scrapbooking ideas and layouts, including general tips on how to use and combine your scrapbooking papers! When you are ready to move beyond the basics, delve into our Scrapbooking Articles section to learn convenient shortcuts and new techniques that will enhance your scrapbook pages, such as embellishments, stamping and journaling. Also be sure to try some of the great scrapbooking ideas found in our Project of the Month section. The scrapbook albums you create will be treasured keepsakes for years to come!

In addition to preserving memories, the hobby is popular for the strong social network that scrapbooking can provide.[13] Hobbyists, known as "scrappers" or "scrapbookers", get together and scrapbook at each other's homes, local scrapbook stores,[14] scrapbooking conventions, retreat centers, and even on cruises.[15] The term "crop", a reference to cropping or trimming printed photographs, was coined to describe these events.[16]


The advent of modern photography began with the first permanent photograph created by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce in 1826.[7] This allowed the average person to begin to incorporate photographs into their scrapbooks. However, books or albums made specifically for showcasing photographs alone were not popularized in the United States until closer to 1860. Before that point, photographs were not thought of as items to be reproduced and shared. Demand for photo albums was spurred on in large part by the growing popularity of the carte de visite, a small photograph distributed in the same manner one might a visiting card.[6]
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