Adhesives are literally the glue that keeps your project together. Your options include glue sticks, tape runner, rubber cement, and glue dots. Rubber cement is recommended for bulky, uneven decorations that standard glue can’t quite stick. Non-permanent adhesives are helpful for readjusting photos or patterned paper. For inevitable mistakes, thankfully there’s adhesive remover. Using quality, archival-safe glues will help your masterpiece stay together for years to come. 

Old scrapbooks tended to have photos mounted with photomounting corners and perhaps notations of who was in a photo or where and when it was taken. They often included bits of memorabilia like newspaper clippings, letters, etc. An early known American scrapbooker and inventor of scrapbooking supplies was Mark Twain. Twain carried scrapbooks on his travels as he collected souvenirs, clippings and pictures.[8][9][10]
They curently do not charge your credit card until it is being packaged for shipping.  They don't hide anything.  "it ships when it ships."  They announce this all the time, especially when they are coming up to their busy times of year.  I can't imagine how many orders they get during her big event times of the year mentioned above.  Must be in the thousands.
Following the lead of Keeping Memories Alive (which was originally in the smaller building next door and named The Annex in its early years), many other stores have popped up and cater to the scrapbooking community. These shops provide many of the necessary tools for every scrapbooker's needs. Besides Keeping Memories Alive, these include companies such as Creative Memories, Making Memories, Stampin' Up!, and Close to My Heart.
The advent of modern photography began with the first permanent photograph created by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce in 1826.[7] This allowed the average person to begin to incorporate photographs into their scrapbooks. However, books or albums made specifically for showcasing photographs alone were not popularized in the United States until closer to 1860. Before that point, photographs were not thought of as items to be reproduced and shared. Demand for photo albums was spurred on in large part by the growing popularity of the carte de visite, a small photograph distributed in the same manner one might a visiting card.[6]
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