Adhesives are literally the glue that keeps your project together. Your options include glue sticks, tape runner, rubber cement, and glue dots. Rubber cement is recommended for bulky, uneven decorations that standard glue can’t quite stick. Non-permanent adhesives are helpful for readjusting photos or patterned paper. For inevitable mistakes, thankfully there’s adhesive remover. Using quality, archival-safe glues will help your masterpiece stay together for years to come. 
During the 19th century, scrapbooking was seen as a more involved way to preserve one’s experiences than journaling or other writing-based forms of logging. Printed material such as cheap newspapers, visiting cards, playbills, and pamphlets circulated widely during the 19th century and often became the primary components of peoples’ scrapbooks.[5] The growing volume of ephemera of this kind, parallel to the growth of industrialized society, created a demand for methods of cataloguing and preserving them. This is why scrapbooks devoted solely to cataloguing recipes, coupons, or other lists were also common during this time. Until later in the 19th century, scrapbooks were seen as functional as well as aesthetically pleasing.[6] Several factors, including marketing strategies and technological advancement, contributed to the image of scrapbooking moving further toward the aesthetic plane over the years.
Basic materials include background papers (including printed and cardstock paper), photo corner mounts (or other means of mounting photos such as adhesive dots, photo mounting tape, or acid-free glue), scissors, a paper trimmer or cutting tool, art pens, archival pens for journaling, and mounting glues (like thermo-tac). More elaborate designs require more specialized tools such as die cut templates, rubber stamps, craft punches, stencils, inking tools, eyelet setters, heat embossing tools and personal die cut machines. A lot of time people who enjoy scrapbooking will create their own background papers by using the tools mentioned along with "fancy" textured scissors.

Scrapbookers will sometimes refer to sketches for inspiration for their pages.[citation needed] Sketches are a hand-drawn layout showing where to position photos, titles, journaling and embellishments. It gives novice scrapbookers somewhere to begin if they are not experienced with balancing the layout correctly. Scrapbookers can interpret the sketch in any way they choose; it is a great starting point when you have scrappers-block. There have been many sketchbooks published and scrapbooking magazines always offer sketches as part of their content.[original research?]
Once you’ve successfully picked the photos, the next step involves selecting a patterned paper for your background, which will not only add color to the page, but also depth. By using patterned paper, you’ll be able to mirror the story that you are trying to tell with photos. Depending on the theme, look, and style, you may be able to find themed papers that will suit your every need. All in all, when selecting the patterned paper, you should select a pattern that enhances your theme.
Once you’ve successfully picked the photos, the next step involves selecting a patterned paper for your background, which will not only add color to the page, but also depth. By using patterned paper, you’ll be able to mirror the story that you are trying to tell with photos. Depending on the theme, look, and style, you may be able to find themed papers that will suit your every need. All in all, when selecting the patterned paper, you should select a pattern that enhances your theme.

Page trimmers allow you to cut paper cleanly and precisely. Use a page trimmer when you need to cut cardstock, patterned paper, or pictures to fit neatly into your album. You can save time by stacking multiple pages in your trimmer and cutting them simultaneously. For smaller cutting tasks, use a sturdy pair of scissors. Long-bladed scissors are helpful for quick cutting jobs that require flexibility, such as cutting out letters or tricky shapes. Scissors are also handy for cutting scrapbook embellishments like ribbons and stamps.


Just like old memories, scrapbook pages often benefit from a few embellishments. There's endless array of arts and crafts decorations available to add spice and pizazz to your journaling. Your options include ribbons, glitter, 3D stickers, and self-adhesive chipboard pieces featuring words or phrases relevant to your theme. In keeping with your personal style and the type of scrapbook you're creating, you can mix and match multiple embellishments to add flair to your story and make your pages pop.


Jump up ^ Strauss, Robert (2001-09-16). "Getting the Hang of Hanging Out". The New York Times. Retrieved 2007-11-04. From 5 to 10 p.m. on those nights, at least a dozen women gather at the tables in the back room. For $5, the store buys them pizza and soda and they get use of the cutting materials and, of course, buy other stuff. You bring your photos and you get scrapbooking ideas.

The advent of scanners, desktop publishing, page layout programs, and advanced printing options make it relatively easy to create professional-looking layouts in digital form. The internet allows scrapbookers to self-publish their work. Scrapbooks that exist completely in digital image form are referred to as "digital scrapbooks" or "computer scrapbooks".[24]
Old scrapbooks tended to have photos mounted with photomounting corners and perhaps notations of who was in a photo or where and when it was taken. They often included bits of memorabilia like newspaper clippings, letters, etc. An early known American scrapbooker and inventor of scrapbooking supplies was Mark Twain. Twain carried scrapbooks on his travels as he collected souvenirs, clippings and pictures.[8][9][10]
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