This store is also a true "Mom and Pop" store that has been run by Tracey and her parents. Many of you have come to know and love this family. You were their when Tracey and her family welcomed Tracey's daughter Amber into their lives and when Tracey lost her belove...d dad. They have had up's, downs and a whole lotta hanging in their trying to keep their doors open. And, like I said, many of you So. Cal Peep's have become family to this store.
Yes lots of product but don't be in a hurry for orders. I received order today of order placed ONE YEAR AGO on July 18, 2016. And it wasn't complete because one item had been "discontinued". I don't believe it for a minute. If been asking and asking and was told it ships when it ships. I asked again on 17th and low and behold they found only part of my order in the sinkhole of orders. Might have lots of good product but if going to have sales be sure to have staff to ship orders before you start yet ANOTHER sale.
Various accessories, referred to as "embellishments", are used to decorate scrapbook pages. Embellishments include stickers, rub-ons, stamps, eyelets, brads, chipboard elements in various shapes, alphabet letters, lace, wire, fabric, beads, sequins, and ribbon. The use of die cut machines is also increasingly popular; in recent years a number of electronic die-cutting machines resembling a plotter with a drag knife have hit the market (e.g. The Cricut), enabling scrappers to use their computer to create die cuts out of any shape or font with the use of free or third party software. Scrapbook makers will also use magazine clippings to "decorate" a scrapbook.
Organizing your tools and paper is half the battle in putting together the ultimate scrapbook. A storage system with lots of drawers will help keep a tidy workspace and work more efficiently. If you're an on-the-go scrapbooker, choose a scrapbook tote with several pockets for all of your art supplies. Totes are ideal for scrapbooking during vacations or getting together with friends for an afternoon of arts and crafts. 
I make a point to order the really good deals with no expectation of delivery dates (as Stacey says all the time, it ships when it ships), which I know can really put some people off. I look at it like this: "I may have to wait a while to get some items, but once I have it, I'm happy with my purchase and will many times have something that I couldn't get for the great price anywhere else". Also, I don't order something thinking that I will need it for a certain project trying to tell myself that it should be here in time. There are plenty of other things to purchase all over the internet for those projects!
The advent of scanners, desktop publishing, page layout programs, and advanced printing options make it relatively easy to create professional-looking layouts in digital form. The internet allows scrapbookers to self-publish their work. Scrapbooks that exist completely in digital image form are referred to as "digital scrapbooks" or "computer scrapbooks".[24]
In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.
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