Now, wha...t do we have for you today? Welp, how about a chance to be a WINNER WINNER and receive a wonderful prize package form SMS filled with the latest and greatest collection from Contour Creations? What do you have to post? Well, Aussie Andrew got the crazy idea to head on down to Florida to talk to a certain retailer about a Couture Creations - Scrapbooking Made Simple - Simply Defined Collaboration. For a chance to WIN, all you have to do is post what retailer YOU think he went to visit!!! And, just as an FYI, I am so not holding my breath about this! It might just be a bit outside MY comfort zone :)

The first step in the Play-to-Create system is to design our layout. Coming up with a design idea that you can be confident about can be the hardest step in the scrapbooking process. Too often we will stare at our materials for hours, trying to will an idea into existence, or we will surf endlessly on the internet trying to find some inspiration. We may resort to sketching something out on a piece of paper, but the end result is never quite what we imagined it would be.
One of the key components of modern scrapbooking is the archival quality of the supplies. Designed to preserve photographs and journaling in their original state, materials encouraged by most serious scrapbookers are of a higher quality than those of many typical photo albums commercially available. Scrappers insist on acid-free, lignin-free papers, stamp ink, and embossing powder. They also use pigment-based inks, which are fade resistant, colorfast, and often waterproof. Many scrappers use buffered paper, which will protect photos from acid in memorabilia used in the scrapbook. Older "magnetic" albums are not acid-free and thus cause damage to the photos and memorabilia included in them. Gloves, too, are used to protect photos from the oil on hands.[23]
Marielen Wadley Christensen (pronounced as the names "Mary Ellen"), of Elk Ridge, Utah, United States (formerly of Spanish Fork, Utah) is credited with turning scrapbooking from what was once just the ages-old hobby into the actual industry containing businesses devoted specifically to the manufacturing and sale of scrapbooking supplies. She began designing creative pages for her family's photo memories, inserting the completed pages into sheet protectors collected in 3-ring binders. By 1980, she had assembled over fifty volumes and was invited to display them at the World Conference on Records in Salt Lake City. In 1981 Marielen and her husband Anthony Jay ("A.J.") authored and published a how-to booklet, Keeping Memories Alive, and opened a scrapbook store in Spanish Fork that ended up with the same name, that remains open today.[11][12]
Fabulous store! They carry a ton of products; dies, stamps, paper, ribbon, gelatos , copics, watercolors, etc. if you need it they probably have it. The store is laid out very well and each product displayed well. Some are grouped well together in project ideas. The staff is extremely knowledgeable, kind and helpful. The products are priced very well. Parking is pretty easy but the parking lot does have a bit of seedy element to it. If you can't attend a free Saturday class, the owner, Stacy, has instructional videos on you tube.
From cute patterns to totally cohesive color palettes, Doodlebug Design is a top-seller: and it’s on SUPER sale. Shop now and save BIG on ALL Doodlebug scrapbooking supplies! With adorable embellishments to cute paper, washi tape to sweet stickers, and more, you’ll definitely want to take advantage of this discount! The discount is already taken from the regular price and reflected in the SALE price on each product page. Shop now for the best selection.
Just like old memories, scrapbook pages often benefit from a few embellishments. There's endless array of arts and crafts decorations available to add spice and pizazz to your journaling. Your options include ribbons, glitter, 3D stickers, and self-adhesive chipboard pieces featuring words or phrases relevant to your theme. In keeping with your personal style and the type of scrapbook you're creating, you can mix and match multiple embellishments to add flair to your story and make your pages pop.
During the 19th century, scrapbooking was seen as a more involved way to preserve one’s experiences than journaling or other writing-based forms of logging. Printed material such as cheap newspapers, visiting cards, playbills, and pamphlets circulated widely during the 19th century and often became the primary components of peoples’ scrapbooks.[5] The growing volume of ephemera of this kind, parallel to the growth of industrialized society, created a demand for methods of cataloguing and preserving them. This is why scrapbooks devoted solely to cataloguing recipes, coupons, or other lists were also common during this time. Until later in the 19th century, scrapbooks were seen as functional as well as aesthetically pleasing.[6] Several factors, including marketing strategies and technological advancement, contributed to the image of scrapbooking moving further toward the aesthetic plane over the years.
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