Adhesives are literally the glue that keeps your project together. Your options include glue sticks, tape runner, rubber cement, and glue dots. Rubber cement is recommended for bulky, uneven decorations that standard glue can’t quite stick. Non-permanent adhesives are helpful for readjusting photos or patterned paper. For inevitable mistakes, thankfully there’s adhesive remover. Using quality, archival-safe glues will help your masterpiece stay together for years to come. 
* We also recommend using our WorkBox on hardwood or tile flooring. If using on carpet, you may need to add a solid surface to allow WorkBox wheels to move freely. Opening and closing the WorkBox on carpet may cause added stress on the product. If you have vinyl flooring, check the manufacturing specs to see what it can tolerate as to weight. The WorkBox can be up to 1200 lbs with added craft supplies!
After you have glued the photo to the matting paper, then cut the other two sides so that you end up with a frame around the photos. An ideal mat will provide a visual space between the paper and the photo, regardless as to whether you’re using a solid color or not. When selecting the color of the mat, you should first consider the dominant color together with the minor colors in the background.
An international standard, ISO 18902, provides specific guidelines on materials that are safe for scrapbooking through its requirements for albums, framing, and storage materials. ISO 18902 includes requirements for photo-safety and a specific pH range for acid-free materials. ISO 18902 prohibits the use of harmful materials, including Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and Cellulose nitrate.
The advent of scanners, desktop publishing, page layout programs, and advanced printing options make it relatively easy to create professional-looking layouts in digital form. The internet allows scrapbookers to self-publish their work. Scrapbooks that exist completely in digital image form are referred to as "digital scrapbooks" or "computer scrapbooks".[24]
Also, also on a good note, I've seen a few of Stacey's videos and have learned some things.  For instance, now i know the difference between a Sizzix Big Kick and a Sizzix Big Shot!  And now i know why I don't see the Big Shot in Joann's or Michael's!  (I hear more of the Big Shot than the Big Kick, so I wanted to find out the difference between them.)
Who is ready for this weeks You Tube....Good 'cause here it is! We are featuring Inky Antics HoneyPOP Collection of stamps and honeycomb paper along with Sizzix Movers and Shapers Dies by Tim Holtz and Stephanie Barnard! Sooooo much fun to create with all of these goodies! And...they are a You Tube Yummies...so they are ON SALE in the shop and online! 

During the 19th century, scrapbooking was seen as a more involved way to preserve one’s experiences than journaling or other writing-based forms of logging. Printed material such as cheap newspapers, visiting cards, playbills, and pamphlets circulated widely during the 19th century and often became the primary components of peoples’ scrapbooks.[5] The growing volume of ephemera of this kind, parallel to the growth of industrialized society, created a demand for methods of cataloguing and preserving them. This is why scrapbooks devoted solely to cataloguing recipes, coupons, or other lists were also common during this time. Until later in the 19th century, scrapbooks were seen as functional as well as aesthetically pleasing.[6] Several factors, including marketing strategies and technological advancement, contributed to the image of scrapbooking moving further toward the aesthetic plane over the years.
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