THIS SATURDAY 10am...It is time for the 4th Semi-Annual Garage Sale at Scrapbooking Made Simple! On top of the deals and steals you will find from our sellers....THE ENTIRE STORE WILL BE TAX FREE for you too. So, shop the bagins in the Garage Sale then shop the NEW GOODIES in the store....ALL TAX FREE!!! Where will you find the best of the best at the best prices...Scrapbooking Made Simple!
I REALLY, REALLY liked this store. I travel about 60 miles to visit it.  I would have given it FIVE… I REALLY, REALLY liked this store. I travel about 60 miles to visit it.  I would have given it FIVE stars because I like the owner and what she is trying to do. Her creations for the Shop that Did Not Hop are fantastic!  I like the Youtube videos a lot-- very helpful.

I love this store.  The employees and the owner are friendly.  And they have the widest selection of product across many companies I have ever seen.  If they are out, they will order it for you.  Yes online orders do take a while, but you have to understand, they are a mom and pop store that gets so many orders, it is impossible for them to get the orders out as timely as many people would like.  Especially if you order during their super busy times of the year like Shop Hop, Sizzix warehouse sale, Spellbinders warehouse sale, and CHA.  If you need something sooner, go to the store and buy it.  If you can wait and don't need it any time soon, but want it, then place and order.
A couple of months went by and I contacted Stacey on her facebook page for the store 12/9/13 inquiring about our product.  She told me our order was mailed out late October 2013 and she would contact USPS and if she had to then resend another order and call me to verify my address.  I left my address on her facebook page and still have not heard from her as of DECEMBER 14, 2013 !!
Just watched the owner of this business berate the employees at a local restaurant for about ten minutes. All while wearing the sweatshirt bearing her company logo and repeatedly touting the fact that she was a local business owner. Good for her I guess? Super professional of her. So go here if you support that kind of behavior. Or you could just hit up the local craft stores instead.
A friend and I went to this store in August 2013 and I ordered a $ 9 stamp set and she ordered a Halloween die for less then $10.  The store sale was 20% off entire store. My friend grabbed the last stamp "My Favorite Things a la modes Fight like a Girl" and so I paid for it and Stacey said she would still give us the 20% off and ship both our orders to us free since they were out of stock on these items.  I gave her my address to mail both items to save her shipping costs.
There are SO many ways to make travel memories last a lifetime. Snap pictures during your time on the long airplane or car ride, save maps from your road-trip, or arrange the scraps from some of your favorite haunts to make vacation memory scrapbooking (ok, ok, and shadow-box displays) easy as pie. (Scientific reminder: any pie eaten while on vacation results in weight LOSS, not gain. It’s vacation science.). Read on for the perfect travel scrapbook inspiration.
In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.
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