I have been buying from Stacey since I found her about three years ago. I love her video classes and she is so real you can't help but love her. The only reason I didn't give this review 5 stars is because of the shipping times. Yes!!! She means it ship when it ships. She tells you up front so don't grow impatient. You will get your stuff and you will be happy with it. I ordered from the last big sale (July 16, 2016) and still haven't gotten my product. The thing is....you can't get the SMS products anywhere else. Her products are exclusive and really good and the prices are fair. She tries to give you as much for your money as she possibly can. She really cares. I have never been to the store (it is on my bucket list) but I have learned so much from her. All I can say is that the SMS products are yummy and she is so cute and the SMS team is doing the best they can. Have some patience - it's hard I know but it will be well worth it!


Regardless of how many photos you use, keep in mind that the photos ought to go with the theme. Once you have successfully selected a suitable theme, work with the photos and do not be afraid to edit until you find the perfect match. Also keep in mind there really is no right or wrong when it comes to scrapbooking made easy, as you can simply do what feels right for you.

Take free video classes from top teachers and designers. Learn how to make beautiful cards, meaningful scrapbook layouts, and other handmade projects. Explore everything from beginning stamping to advanced die cutting and everything else you can imagine. Other sites charge $20 to $40 for similar classes, but Scrapbook.com offers these lessons at no cost.

During the 19th century, scrapbooking was seen as a more involved way to preserve one’s experiences than journaling or other writing-based forms of logging. Printed material such as cheap newspapers, visiting cards, playbills, and pamphlets circulated widely during the 19th century and often became the primary components of peoples’ scrapbooks.[5] The growing volume of ephemera of this kind, parallel to the growth of industrialized society, created a demand for methods of cataloguing and preserving them. This is why scrapbooks devoted solely to cataloguing recipes, coupons, or other lists were also common during this time. Until later in the 19th century, scrapbooks were seen as functional as well as aesthetically pleasing.[6] Several factors, including marketing strategies and technological advancement, contributed to the image of scrapbooking moving further toward the aesthetic plane over the years.
×