However, I placed an order in July on the first day of a big sale....and I am still waiting for it THREE months later.  I realize the advertising for the sale said that their usual shipping times would not apply during the sale, but three months without specific notice that it would be that long is simply unacceptable. I was waiting for certain items to make merchandise for Fall draft fairs. Well, forget that-- I have had to go out and buy what I needed. (These are all dies that don't get used up. Maybe I will get my money back if I sell t hem on Ebay-- someday.)

A NEW manufacturer comes to Scrapbooking Made Simple today! Let's all welcome Studio Light and their incredibly affordable decoupage books. When I say "bang for your buck", I mean it when it comes to this products. It is all stunning. It is all easy to use. It allows you to keep things simple or BAM...take them up a notch! It really is a wonderful product for all types of crafters!
Basic materials include background papers (including printed and cardstock paper), photo corner mounts (or other means of mounting photos such as adhesive dots, photo mounting tape, or acid-free glue), scissors, a paper trimmer or cutting tool, art pens, archival pens for journaling, and mounting glues (like thermo-tac). More elaborate designs require more specialized tools such as die cut templates, rubber stamps, craft punches, stencils, inking tools, eyelet setters, heat embossing tools and personal die cut machines. A lot of time people who enjoy scrapbooking will create their own background papers by using the tools mentioned along with "fancy" textured scissors.
One of the newest trends into scrapbooking is bringing the layout designs down to a much smaller size.[citation needed] Small enough to carry in a small bag with on the go updates and area for creativity and memory keeping. A traditional Traveler’s Notebook is a simple leather cover with a band to keep closed. The cover can hold up to six inserts which can be used in many ways. The notebook has grown in popularity, allowing for journaling and memory keeping for any interests.
Scrapbooking crops (or "Crops") are events where 2 or more scrapbookers gather to work in a social circle on their books, cards or other projects. It is similar to the old quilting bees that used to be socially prevalent, but has been replaced by today's "Crop". Attendees bring specific supplies themselves to work on said projects and sometimes there are vendors at these events to purchase any extra scrapbooking needs. At these events ideas are shared, techniques are taught to one another, products used (e.g. cutting machines such as, Silhouette & Cricut) are learned about and attendees have a few hours to days of uninterrupted time to work on their scrapbooks, cards, or any project they are needing to accomplish. Events are planned informally at one's home, a church hall or establishments with meeting rooms to the larger attended crops that encompass days of time in a hotel, where the attendee stays in the same hotel and works in the large ballroom or conference rooms in the hotel with tens to hundreds of attendees. Some of the ways to learn about events are mainly through word of mouth, social media and community postings.
Jump up ^ Strauss, Robert (2001-09-16). "Getting the Hang of Hanging Out". The New York Times. Retrieved 2007-11-04. From 5 to 10 p.m. on those nights, at least a dozen women gather at the tables in the back room. For $5, the store buys them pizza and soda and they get use of the cutting materials and, of course, buy other stuff. You bring your photos and you get scrapbooking ideas.
Following the lead of Keeping Memories Alive (which was originally in the smaller building next door and named The Annex in its early years), many other stores have popped up and cater to the scrapbooking community. These shops provide many of the necessary tools for every scrapbooker's needs. Besides Keeping Memories Alive, these include companies such as Creative Memories, Making Memories, Stampin' Up!, and Close to My Heart.
First and foremost…We love paper! Everyone on the Kiwi team is a self-proclaimed paper addict! And what’s not to love? The colors, patterns and textures available in our paper stashes are a treasure trove of creative potential, and it turns out that they are also a big part of the solution to those frustrations we mentioned earlier! Paper is the perfect way to dress up any layout with layer upon layer of color and texture. Using our paper properly will result in scrapbooks that look like a million bucks, without actually costing us an arm and a leg! But how to go about tapping into this resource? Well, that’s where our Designer Templates come in!
Shop the largest papercrafting shop in the world and get everything you need for your handmade craft projects in one easy-to-use place. You'll find a wide selection of scrapbook paper, albums, die cutting machines and dies, stamps, inks and much more. Scrapbook.com offers a 60-day money-back guarantee and 5-star customer service so you can shop with confidence.
Anytime is a good time to finally get those scrapbooking ideas down on paper (or patterned paper!). It can be easy to have incredible experiences but no time to document all of those memories. Luckily, we have a slew of scrapbook ideas that will get your scrapbook design juices flowing. Whether you prefer digital designs or scrapbooking with a whole gang of scrapbook supplies rolling around the table, let these pages be a catalyst for assembling truly creative scrapbook spreads.
Once you have finished working on the scrapbook page, place it in a sheet protector, then into the scrapbook album. For easier addition of pages, three ring binders are highly recommended. Feel free to make as many pages as will fit comfortably in your scrapbook and when you finish one, you may begin a whole new process with another scrapbook album.
In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.
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