This book was created by the makers of the Simple Scrapbooks magazine. It's a great resource for people who want to create simple and contemporary scrapbooks. It's well organized and has all kinds of great tips for a beginner scrapbooker and examples to inspire advanced scrapbookers. There are plenty of ideas for scrapbook albums, layouts, journaling, use of colors and patterns, etc. Probably the best scrapbooking book I've read so far.
The first step in the Play-to-Create system is to design our layout. Coming up with a design idea that you can be confident about can be the hardest step in the scrapbooking process. Too often we will stare at our materials for hours, trying to will an idea into existence, or we will surf endlessly on the internet trying to find some inspiration. We may resort to sketching something out on a piece of paper, but the end result is never quite what we imagined it would be.
Scrapbooking crops (or "Crops") are events where 2 or more scrapbookers gather to work in a social circle on their books, cards or other projects. It is similar to the old quilting bees that used to be socially prevalent, but has been replaced by today's "Crop". Attendees bring specific supplies themselves to work on said projects and sometimes there are vendors at these events to purchase any extra scrapbooking needs. At these events ideas are shared, techniques are taught to one another, products used (e.g. cutting machines such as, Silhouette & Cricut) are learned about and attendees have a few hours to days of uninterrupted time to work on their scrapbooks, cards, or any project they are needing to accomplish. Events are planned informally at one's home, a church hall or establishments with meeting rooms to the larger attended crops that encompass days of time in a hotel, where the attendee stays in the same hotel and works in the large ballroom or conference rooms in the hotel with tens to hundreds of attendees. Some of the ways to learn about events are mainly through word of mouth, social media and community postings.
Early digital scrapbooks were created from digital photos uploaded to an external site. Over time, this moved to a model of downloading software onto a personal computer that will organize photos and help create the digital scrapbook. With the growth of Web 2.0 functionality, digital scrapbooking is going back online, to avoid the hassles of having to download and install PC software. The availability of cheap online storage (e.g., on Amazon's S3 service), and the desire to leverage pre-uploaded online albums (e.g., on Yahoo's Flickr) make it more convenient for users to directly compose their digital scrapbooks online. Print on demand fulfillment enables such digital scrapbooks to effectively supplant traditional scrapbooks.
Whatever theme you've chosen for your scrapbook, you'll need a few essentials to get started. First, you'll need an album and its basic contents: cardstock, patterned paper and page protectors. Next, you need a selection of tools and supplies, including pencils, coloured markers, adhesives, a ruler and a page trimmer. Embellishments are an exciting part of scrapbooking. Your choice of ribbons, glitter or 3D stickers will inject your personality into your scrapbook and make the individual pages stand out. Staying organized is essential: a basic storage system will help keep your mind and workspace tidy so you can focus on being creative and having fun. 
Scrapbooking is a method of preserving, presenting, arranging personal and family history in the form of a book, box, card. Typical memorabilia include photographs, printed media, and artwork. Scrapbook albums are often decorated and frequently contain extensive journaling. Scrapbooking started in the United Kingdom in the nineteenth century, but is now primarily a United States phenomenon.
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