This is a great book for scrapbookers. It has many ideas on scrapbook pages for people who have a lot of time and those who just have a little time. It also gives ideas on how to use color, handwriting and fonts, how to sort and store your stuff, and how to make digital pages. I found it very useful to get ideas and thought it was organized well and easy to use.
Scrapbooking is one of the largest categories within the craft and hobby industry and now considered[by whom?] to be the third most popular craft in the nation. From 1996 through 2004, sales of scrapbooking products increased across the United States. In 2005, annual sales flattened for the first time after many back to back years of double growth. From 2006 through 2010 traditional scrapbooking sales have declined, while digital forms of scrapbooking have grown. Traditional scrapbooking sales for 2010 have declined to about $1.6 billion in annual sales from a peak of about $2.5 billion in 2005.[28]
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Shop the largest papercrafting shop in the world and get everything you need for your handmade craft projects in one easy-to-use place. You'll find a wide selection of scrapbook paper, albums, die cutting machines and dies, stamps, inks and much more. Scrapbook.com offers a 60-day money-back guarantee and 5-star customer service so you can shop with confidence.
The advent of modern photography began with the first permanent photograph created by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce in 1826.[7] This allowed the average person to begin to incorporate photographs into their scrapbooks. However, books or albums made specifically for showcasing photographs alone were not popularized in the United States until closer to 1860. Before that point, photographs were not thought of as items to be reproduced and shared. Demand for photo albums was spurred on in large part by the growing popularity of the carte de visite, a small photograph distributed in the same manner one might a visiting card.[6]
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