And don’t worry about cutting a perfect line! A little bit of ink along the edge of each element will hide any blemishes as well as covering up any leftover pencil marks. We also recommend inking your edges as a way to take full advantage of the paper that you’ve chosen to use.Adding ink to each piece will separate the layers of your creation in a way that will highlight the patterns and colors in your paper and add a sense of depth to your layout. To see a demonstration of this step, as well as some tips on cutting, watch this quick video.
My wife goes to SMS quite literally all the time so I suppose you could say I go here all the time. I am not a scrapbook aficionado because I am quite literally "artistically challenged." I own it, I admit it, I don't try to pretend I'm anything I'm not. However, having been in this store as many times as I have with my wife, I feel the need to elaborate more specifically on the things the spouses of scrapbooking people might enjoy: + Clean restroom, always clean. Yes, we notice these things. + Lots of goodies for customers. Who doesn't like candy? + Staff is always super nice and friendly! + Stacy, the owner, is probably one of the nicest, most sincere people I've ever met. + Most important: There is a "husband chair." Suggestions: * Wi-Fi. Husbands like Wi-Fi. (A PlayStation wouldn't hurt either...) Warnings: It can get very crowded, especially when there is a sale--maybe not Costco proportions but crowded nonetheless. They have multiple registers open, and they're pretty efficient about getting people checked out. Cell service can be very spotty in the store. That's not a SMS problem but just be warned that you may not be able to make/receive calls reliably while you're in the store.
Some snacks and water are complementary... maybe I shouldn't have said that coz there might be some shameless people that would go and just grab the snacks without purchasing anything. But they are there for those scrapping. Hey, the longer you stay there, the more likely you are to buy more stuff. Yeah, I was only supposed to buy a couple of pages and cut a couple of things... I walked out with $40 worth of paper!
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I make a point to order the really good deals with no expectation of delivery dates (as Stacey says all the time, it ships when it ships), which I know can really put some people off. I look at it like this: "I may have to wait a while to get some items, but once I have it, I'm happy with my purchase and will many times have something that I couldn't get for the great price anywhere else". Also, I don't order something thinking that I will need it for a certain project trying to tell myself that it should be here in time. There are plenty of other things to purchase all over the internet for those projects!
And for a chance to be a WINNER WINNER Chicken Dinner Peep here at Scrapbooking Made Simple...all you have to do is tell me the NEW Simply Defined product that you would want to WIN! You have three choices....Would you want to WIN Some of the NEW Simply Defined Dies, Simply Defined Stamps or Simply Defined Hot Foil Plates?? To see the entire collection, click the link to the You Tube SALE!!!
For example, college women around the turn of the century used scrapbooks extensively to construct representations of their everyday life as students. Without photograph albums to provide images of these life events, students created unique representations through scrapbooks in order to illustrate their lives using ephemera and memorabilia. A guest list or group of visiting cards might represent a young woman’s visit to a party. A playbill and ticket stub might serve as reminders of a trip to New York to see a Broadway show. Solid objects such as plants, silverware, or small trinkets were also used when further visual representation was needed.
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