Fabulous store! They carry a ton of products; dies, stamps, paper, ribbon, gelatos , copics, watercolors, etc. if you need it they probably have it. The store is laid out very well and each product displayed well. Some are grouped well together in project ideas. The staff is extremely knowledgeable, kind and helpful. The products are priced very well.  Parking is pretty easy but the parking lot does have a bit of seedy element to it.
From cute patterns to totally cohesive color palettes, Doodlebug Design is a top-seller: and it’s on SUPER sale. Shop now and save BIG on ALL Doodlebug scrapbooking supplies! With adorable embellishments to cute paper, washi tape to sweet stickers, and more, you’ll definitely want to take advantage of this discount! The discount is already taken from the regular price and reflected in the SALE price on each product page. Shop now for the best selection.
My wife goes to SMS quite literally all the time so I suppose you could say I go here all the time. I am not a scrapbook aficionado because I am quite literally "artistically challenged." I own it, I admit it, I don't try to pretend I'm anything I'm not. However, having been in this store as many times as I have with my wife, I feel the need to elaborate more specifically on the things the spouses of scrapbooking people might enjoy: + Clean restroom, always clean. Yes, we notice these things. + Lots of goodies for customers. Who doesn't like candy? + Staff is always super nice and friendly! + Stacy, the owner, is probably one of the nicest, most sincere people I've ever met. + Most important: There is a "husband chair." Suggestions: * Wi-Fi. Husbands like Wi-Fi. (A PlayStation wouldn't hurt either...) Warnings: It can get very crowded, especially when there is a sale--maybe not Costco proportions but crowded nonetheless. They have multiple registers open, and they're pretty efficient about getting people checked out. Cell service can be very spotty in the store. That's not a SMS problem but just be warned that you may not be able to make/receive calls reliably while you're in the store.

Early digital scrapbooks were created from digital photos uploaded to an external site. Over time, this moved to a model of downloading software onto a personal computer that will organize photos and help create the digital scrapbook. With the growth of Web 2.0 functionality, digital scrapbooking is going back online, to avoid the hassles of having to download and install PC software. The availability of cheap online storage (e.g., on Amazon's S3 service), and the desire to leverage pre-uploaded online albums (e.g., on Yahoo's Flickr) make it more convenient for users to directly compose their digital scrapbooks online. Print on demand fulfillment enables such digital scrapbooks to effectively supplant traditional scrapbooks.
500 Handmade with Love Stickers Seals DIY Craft Round 1" Lables with Red Heart Party Favours Specifications: Round 500 adhesive labels, each roll has 500 labels. Size: label diameter - 1 inches/2.5cm Material: high-quality kraft paper, with clear print and stiff feel. With reel design, our labels are easier to store.Sticker reads 'handmade with love' in black ink and features an eye catching red heart Decorate Thank you cards: to increase fun to Thank you cards, to show your appreciation to your family, customers or suppliers. Perfect DIY Gift Decor: Use the labels to seal food packaging such as cake, pastry, biscuit, Maccaron, chocolate and so on. Perfect for wedding, anniversary, gift or birthday parties and thank you envelopes.
Because I can't figure out how to edit my 10/15/14 review: My mid-July order arrived in November-- just short of FOUR MONTHS. I stay by my review, and agree with the reviewer that you shouldn't order something you need for a specific purpose or by a specific date. I ordered things for Halloween and fall craft fairs (thinking no guaranteed shipping would still get it to me in, say, two months) and ended up having to order a couple of things elsewhere! I will need to ebay the duplicates. Any savings I had disappeared. This store has the latest and greatest, but by the time you get it.... the stuff is no longer the "latest!" I will continue to visit when possible, but I will order elsewhere.
Do not judge a book by it's cover is exactly what I thought when I pushed open the doors to this shop yesterday! It's in a pretty old strip mall with a ridiculous parking situation and tucked back in the corner, but what a very nice surprise indeed! Clean, well stocked with plenty of employees all asking if they can be of service makes for an enjoyable shopping experience.
In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.
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