This is a really cute store with everything you need for cards and scrapbooking. I came here for their "garage sale" and bought wonderful things for unbelievable prices. Their normal items are at reasonable also. BUT...if you order anything online it takes a very long to receive, regardless of "shop that didn't hop" sales. I've been waiting 10 weeks and they still cannot give me a delivery time of my products, some items are in stock but will be delivered with the "close out" items. Very disappointing.
So, here it is, once again, my shout out to those of you in sunny California. This weekend, pass up coming to SMS. Instead, take your crafty budget, regardless of if it is big or small, and make the trip to see Wooten's Scrapbook Store. They are having a wonderful SALE along with selling off their fixtures! And, who doesn't need storage for all of your stash.
Plenty of free parking with no time limits because they have their own parking lot. This shop is in a center with 4 different food establishments. YES! If you're a scrapbooker, you know why that's important. And the no time limit parking. As soon as you enter, you'll see two work tables. I thought this was it... but then we ventured to the back and oh boy! That is a HUGE work area. Love it! Larger than any of the scrapbooking places I've been to in Orange County. I used to frequent 3 different ones. Some snacks and water are complementary... maybe I shouldn't have said that coz there might be some shameless people that would go and just grab the snacks without purchasing anything. But they are there for those scrapping. Hey, the longer you stay there, the more likely you are to buy more stuff. Yeah, I was only supposed to buy a couple of pages and cut a couple of things... I walked out with $40 worth of paper! The papers are kinda expensive, which is normal... but they don't have a sales rack, which I haven't seen before. The ladies are extremely helpful. I WILL BE BACK! THIS WEEK IF I CAN!!!
Fabulous store! They carry a ton of products; dies, stamps, paper, ribbon, gelatos , copics, watercolors, etc. if you need it they probably have it. The store is laid out very well and each product displayed well. Some are grouped well together in project ideas. The staff is extremely knowledgeable, kind and helpful. The products are priced very well. Parking is pretty easy but the parking lot does have a bit of seedy element to it. If you can't attend a free Saturday class, the owner, Stacy, has instructional videos on you tube.
One of the newest trends into scrapbooking is bringing the layout designs down to a much smaller size.[citation needed] Small enough to carry in a small bag with on the go updates and area for creativity and memory keeping. A traditional Traveler’s Notebook is a simple leather cover with a band to keep closed. The cover can hold up to six inserts which can be used in many ways. The notebook has grown in popularity, allowing for journaling and memory keeping for any interests.
The scrapbooking industry doubled in size between 2001 and 2004 to $2.5 billion[17] with over 1,600 companies creating scrapbooking products by 2003. Creative Memories, a home-based retailer of scrapbooking supplies founded in 1987, saw $425 million in retail sales in 2004.[18] Creative Memories' parent company did file Chapter 11 in 2013 and became the bankruptcy with the largest debt in the Twin City area.[19]

Shop the largest papercrafting shop in the world and get everything you need for your handmade craft projects in one easy-to-use place. You'll find a wide selection of scrapbook paper, albums, die cutting machines and dies, stamps, inks and much more. Scrapbook.com offers a 60-day money-back guarantee and 5-star customer service so you can shop with confidence.
During the 19th century, scrapbooking was seen as a more involved way to preserve one’s experiences than journaling or other writing-based forms of logging. Printed material such as cheap newspapers, visiting cards, playbills, and pamphlets circulated widely during the 19th century and often became the primary components of peoples’ scrapbooks.[5] The growing volume of ephemera of this kind, parallel to the growth of industrialized society, created a demand for methods of cataloguing and preserving them. This is why scrapbooks devoted solely to cataloguing recipes, coupons, or other lists were also common during this time. Until later in the 19th century, scrapbooks were seen as functional as well as aesthetically pleasing.[6] Several factors, including marketing strategies and technological advancement, contributed to the image of scrapbooking moving further toward the aesthetic plane over the years.
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