The following photographs show some of the pages from a "Memorial of Friendship" scrapbook kept by Anne Wagner, a British woman, between 1795 and 1834. She belonged to the same social circle as the poet Percy Bysshe Shelley. Anne Wagner's scrapbook includes pages she created, as well as contributions from friends and relatives. The scrapbook contains handwritten poems, notes left by friends and relatives, and decoupage ephemera like locks of hair, decorative paper clippings, ribbons, and detailed watercolour sketches.
Scrapbooking is one of the largest categories within the craft and hobby industry and now considered[by whom?] to be the third most popular craft in the nation. From 1996 through 2004, sales of scrapbooking products increased across the United States. In 2005, annual sales flattened for the first time after many back to back years of double growth. From 2006 through 2010 traditional scrapbooking sales have declined, while digital forms of scrapbooking have grown. Traditional scrapbooking sales for 2010 have declined to about $1.6 billion in annual sales from a peak of about $2.5 billion in 2005.[28]
Marielen Wadley Christensen (pronounced as the names "Mary Ellen"), of Elk Ridge, Utah, United States (formerly of Spanish Fork, Utah) is credited with turning scrapbooking from what was once just the ages-old hobby into the actual industry containing businesses devoted specifically to the manufacturing and sale of scrapbooking supplies. She began designing creative pages for her family's photo memories, inserting the completed pages into sheet protectors collected in 3-ring binders. By 1980, she had assembled over fifty volumes and was invited to display them at the World Conference on Records in Salt Lake City. In 1981 Marielen and her husband Anthony Jay ("A.J.") authored and published a how-to booklet, Keeping Memories Alive, and opened a scrapbook store in Spanish Fork that ended up with the same name, that remains open today.[11][12]
Hi there! I am Stacey, owner of Scrapbooking Made Simple, a retail and online store! Every Saturday, we bring you a You Tube Class Called "Saturday's With Stacey"! These classes are all about using what you may already own, showing you new products all while keeping this great hobby affordable! So, please subscribe to our channel and welcome to Scrapbooking Made Simple!
2.5 stars. Generally, the examples are way too busy for my tastes (I think they are trying to sell more products.) Good basic ideas and layouts for beginners. Offers lots of encouragement. Covers everything from fonts to cropping to creating your work space to embellishments to album ideas. As a long time scrapbooker, I found it was NOT made easy, simply because there was so much in it.
I have been buying from Stacey since I found her about three years ago.  I love her video classes and she is so real you can't help but love her.  The only reason I didn't give this review 5 stars is because of the shipping times.  Yes!!! She means it ship when it ships. She tells you up front so don't grow impatient.  You will get your stuff and you will be happy with it.  I ordered from the last big sale (July 16, 2016) and still haven't gotten my product.  The thing is....you can't get the SMS products anywhere else.  Her products are exclusive and really good and the prices are fair.  She tries to give you as much for your money as she possibly can.  She really cares.  I have never been to the store (it is on my bucket list) but I have learned so much from her.  All I can say is that the SMS products are yummy and she is so cute and the SMS team is doing the best they can.  Have some patience - it's hard I know but it will be well worth it!
Instant cameras and film are ridiculously fun, creative ways for making and sharing memories. Paste them into books, with as much or as little text as you desire, or pick a wall in your home/office to create a personalized art installation. They can be used to make a baby book or be more travel-centric. Also, whether you have a classic Polaroid or a new Instax, they are so easy to use, that your kids can have their own roll of film to capture memories of their own. Photo strips from photo booths work great, too!
Do not judge a book by it's cover is exactly what I thought when I pushed open the doors to this shop yesterday! It's in a pretty old strip mall with a ridiculous parking situation and tucked back in the corner, but what a very nice surprise indeed! Clean, well stocked with plenty of employees all asking if they can be of service makes for an enjoyable shopping experience.

While some people prefer the physicality of the actual artifacts they paste onto the pages of books, the digital scrapbooking hobby has grown in popularity in recent years.[25] Some of the advantages include a greater diversity of materials, less environmental impact, cost savings, the ability to share finished pages more readily on the internet, and the use of image editing software to experiment with manipulating page elements in multiple ways without making permanent adjustments.[26] A traditional scrapbook layout may employ a background paper with a torn edge. While a physical page can only be torn once and never restored, a digital paper can be torn and untorn with ease, allowing the scrapbooker to try out different looks without wasting supplies. Some web-based digital scrapbooks include a variety of wallpapers and backgrounds to help the users create a rich visual experience. Each paper, photo, or embellishment exists on its own layer in your document, and you can reposition them at your discretion.[27]

One of the key components of modern scrapbooking is the archival quality of the supplies. Designed to preserve photographs and journaling in their original state, materials encouraged by most serious scrapbookers are of a higher quality than those of many typical photo albums commercially available. Scrappers insist on acid-free, lignin-free papers, stamp ink, and embossing powder. They also use pigment-based inks, which are fade resistant, colorfast, and often waterproof. Many scrappers use buffered paper, which will protect photos from acid in memorabilia used in the scrapbook. Older "magnetic" albums are not acid-free and thus cause damage to the photos and memorabilia included in them. Gloves, too, are used to protect photos from the oil on hands.[23]


The scrapbooking industry doubled in size between 2001 and 2004 to $2.5 billion[17] with over 1,600 companies creating scrapbooking products by 2003. Creative Memories, a home-based retailer of scrapbooking supplies founded in 1987, saw $425 million in retail sales in 2004.[18] Creative Memories' parent company did file Chapter 11 in 2013 and became the bankruptcy with the largest debt in the Twin City area.[19]
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