However, I placed an order in July on the first day of a big sale....and I am still waiting for it THREE months later.  I realize the advertising for the sale said that their usual shipping times would not apply during the sale, but three months without specific notice that it would be that long is simply unacceptable. I was waiting for certain items to make merchandise for Fall draft fairs. Well, forget that-- I have had to go out and buy what I needed. (These are all dies that don't get used up. Maybe I will get my money back if I sell t hem on Ebay-- someday.)
Warnings: It can get very crowded, especially when there is a sale--maybe not Costco proportions but crowded nonetheless. They have multiple registers open, and they're pretty efficient about getting people checked out. Cell service can be very spotty in the store. That's not a SMS problem but just be warned that you may not be able to make/receive calls reliably while you're in the store.

Many consider journaling one of the most important elements of any scrapbook.[29] Journaling is a personal choice and it can describe the event, the photographs, or relate feelings and emotions. Handwritten journaling is considered best by some scrapbookers who see handwriting as valuable for posterity, but many people journal on the computer and print it onto a variety of surfaces including vellum, tape, ribbon, and paper.
Warnings: It can get very crowded, especially when there is a sale--maybe not Costco proportions but crowded nonetheless. They have multiple registers open, and they're pretty efficient about getting people checked out. Cell service can be very spotty in the store. That's not a SMS problem but just be warned that you may not be able to make/receive calls reliably while you're in the store.

In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.

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