Instant cameras and film are ridiculously fun, creative ways for making and sharing memories. Paste them into books, with as much or as little text as you desire, or pick a wall in your home/office to create a personalized art installation. They can be used to make a baby book or be more travel-centric. Also, whether you have a classic Polaroid or a new Instax, they are so easy to use, that your kids can have their own roll of film to capture memories of their own. Photo strips from photo booths work great, too!
A NEW manufacturer comes to Scrapbooking Made Simple today! Let's all welcome Studio Light and their incredibly affordable decoupage books. When I say "bang for your buck", I mean it when it comes to this products. It is all stunning. It is all easy to use. It allows you to keep things simple or BAM...take them up a notch! It really is a wonderful product for all types of crafters!
Yes lots of product but don't be in a hurry for orders.  I received order today of order placed ONE YEAR AGO on July 18, 2016.  And it wasn't complete because one item had been "discontinued".  I don't believe it for a minute.  If been asking and asking and was told it ships when it ships.  I asked again on 17th and low and behold they found only part of my order in the sinkhole of orders.  Might have lots of good product but if going to have sales be sure to have staff to ship orders before you start yet ANOTHER sale.
While some people prefer the physicality of the actual artifacts they paste onto the pages of books, the digital scrapbooking hobby has grown in popularity in recent years.[25] Some of the advantages include a greater diversity of materials, less environmental impact, cost savings, the ability to share finished pages more readily on the internet, and the use of image editing software to experiment with manipulating page elements in multiple ways without making permanent adjustments.[26] A traditional scrapbook layout may employ a background paper with a torn edge. While a physical page can only be torn once and never restored, a digital paper can be torn and untorn with ease, allowing the scrapbooker to try out different looks without wasting supplies. Some web-based digital scrapbooks include a variety of wallpapers and backgrounds to help the users create a rich visual experience. Each paper, photo, or embellishment exists on its own layer in your document, and you can reposition them at your discretion.[27]
This book was created by the makers of the Simple Scrapbooks magazine. It's a great resource for people who want to create simple and contemporary scrapbooks. It's well organized and has all kinds of great tips for a beginner scrapbooker and examples to inspire advanced scrapbookers. There are plenty of ideas for scrapbook albums, layouts, journaling, use of colors and patterns, etc. Probably the best scrapbooking book I've read so far.
Fabulous store! They carry a ton of products; dies, stamps, paper, ribbon, gelatos , copics, watercolors, etc. if you need it they probably have it. The store is laid out very well and each product displayed well. Some are grouped well together in project ideas. The staff is extremely knowledgeable, kind and helpful. The products are priced very well.  Parking is pretty easy but the parking lot does have a bit of seedy element to it.

In addition to preserving memories, the hobby is popular for the strong social network that scrapbooking can provide.[13] Hobbyists, known as "scrappers" or "scrapbookers", get together and scrapbook at each other's homes, local scrapbook stores,[14] scrapbooking conventions, retreat centers, and even on cruises.[15] The term "crop", a reference to cropping or trimming printed photographs, was coined to describe these events.[16]


Jump up ^ Jarvik, Elaine (1997-04-23). "Memories & mementos". Deseret News. p. C1. [P]eople trace scrapbooking's early beginnings to Marielen Christensen, a Spanish Fork homemaker who began in the mid-1970s to research ways to better preserve family records and memories. ... When Christensen discovered sources for more durable materials and acid-free papers and glues, she began to spread the word, first at the World Conference on Records in 1980 in Salt Lake City and later at BYU Education Week. In 1981, the Christensens (who by then had made more than 50 scrapbooks for their own family) wrote a how-to book and started a mail-order business, Keeping Memories Alive, to sell archival supplies.

Includes 79 clear totes! 13 clear zipper velcro pouches. 3 wood drawers. 7 shelves with acrylic guards. 2 optional metal rods for ribbons, washi tape, or small punches. 6 large hooks. 3  storage pockets. Cutout for electrical cords. 12 caster wheels to allow unit to glide across (most*) flooring. Fold out table and additional storage underneath.        
Because I can't figure out how to edit my 10/15/14 review:  My mid-July order arrived in November-- just short of FOUR MONTHS. I stay by my review, and agree with the reviewer that you shouldn't order something you need for a specific purpose or by a specific date. I ordered things for Halloween and fall craft fairs (thinking no guaranteed shipping would still get it to me in, say, two months) and ended up having to order a couple of things elsewhere! I will need to ebay the duplicates. Any savings I had disappeared.
While some people prefer the physicality of the actual artifacts they paste onto the pages of books, the digital scrapbooking hobby has grown in popularity in recent years.[25] Some of the advantages include a greater diversity of materials, less environmental impact, cost savings, the ability to share finished pages more readily on the internet, and the use of image editing software to experiment with manipulating page elements in multiple ways without making permanent adjustments.[26] A traditional scrapbook layout may employ a background paper with a torn edge. While a physical page can only be torn once and never restored, a digital paper can be torn and untorn with ease, allowing the scrapbooker to try out different looks without wasting supplies. Some web-based digital scrapbooks include a variety of wallpapers and backgrounds to help the users create a rich visual experience. Each paper, photo, or embellishment exists on its own layer in your document, and you can reposition them at your discretion.[27]

Basic materials include background papers (including printed and cardstock paper), photo corner mounts (or other means of mounting photos such as adhesive dots, photo mounting tape, or acid-free glue), scissors, a paper trimmer or cutting tool, art pens, archival pens for journaling, and mounting glues (like thermo-tac). More elaborate designs require more specialized tools such as die cut templates, rubber stamps, craft punches, stencils, inking tools, eyelet setters, heat embossing tools and personal die cut machines. A lot of time people who enjoy scrapbooking will create their own background papers by using the tools mentioned along with "fancy" textured scissors.
Do not judge a book by it's cover is exactly what I thought when I pushed open the doors to this shop yesterday! It's in a pretty old strip mall with a ridiculous parking situation and tucked back in the corner, but what a very nice surprise indeed! Clean, well stocked with plenty of employees all asking if they can be of service makes for an enjoyable shopping experience.
In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.
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