I REALLY, REALLY liked this store. I travel about 60 miles to visit it.  I would have given it FIVE… I REALLY, REALLY liked this store. I travel about 60 miles to visit it.  I would have given it FIVE stars because I like the owner and what she is trying to do. Her creations for the Shop that Did Not Hop are fantastic!  I like the Youtube videos a lot-- very helpful.
Now, sadly, we do not ship 12 x 12 paper as we are just not good at it! We don't want you to have any bent corners :) So, we are stocking their 8 x 8 Paper Pads and all the lovely embellishments to go with! I have to give Graphic 45 and their wonderful staff a BIG SHOUT OUT as they have all... been so wahooo kachooo ahhhmazing! I think that they are as excited to be back at SMS as we are to have their newest lovelies that so make my heart happy!!
Scrapbooking crops (or "Crops") are events where 2 or more scrapbookers gather to work in a social circle on their books, cards or other projects. It is similar to the old quilting bees that used to be socially prevalent, but has been replaced by today's "Crop". Attendees bring specific supplies themselves to work on said projects and sometimes there are vendors at these events to purchase any extra scrapbooking needs. At these events ideas are shared, techniques are taught to one another, products used (e.g. cutting machines such as, Silhouette & Cricut) are learned about and attendees have a few hours to days of uninterrupted time to work on their scrapbooks, cards, or any project they are needing to accomplish. Events are planned informally at one's home, a church hall or establishments with meeting rooms to the larger attended crops that encompass days of time in a hotel, where the attendee stays in the same hotel and works in the large ballroom or conference rooms in the hotel with tens to hundreds of attendees. Some of the ways to learn about events are mainly through word of mouth, social media and community postings.

Once you’ve successfully picked the photos, the next step involves selecting a patterned paper for your background, which will not only add color to the page, but also depth. By using patterned paper, you’ll be able to mirror the story that you are trying to tell with photos. Depending on the theme, look, and style, you may be able to find themed papers that will suit your every need. All in all, when selecting the patterned paper, you should select a pattern that enhances your theme.


Instant cameras and film are ridiculously fun, creative ways for making and sharing memories. Paste them into books, with as much or as little text as you desire, or pick a wall in your home/office to create a personalized art installation. They can be used to make a baby book or be more travel-centric. Also, whether you have a classic Polaroid or a new Instax, they are so easy to use, that your kids can have their own roll of film to capture memories of their own. Photo strips from photo booths work great, too!
Hi there! I am Stacey, owner of Scrapbooking Made Simple, a retail and online store! Every Saturday, we bring you a You Tube Class Called "Saturday's With Stacey"! These classes are all about using what you may already own, showing you new products all while keeping this great hobby affordable! So, please subscribe to our channel and welcome to Scrapbooking Made Simple!
Below are ...just a few of the samples that will be shown in this week's Saturday With Stacey You Tube Class #269! And, for your chance to be a WINNER WINNER CHICKEN DINNER Peep what do you have to post? Well, both Studio Light B.V and Aladine are international companies and need some well wishes from their friends across the pond (that would be YOU!) Click their name that is BLUE in this post to visit their site and somewhere....anywhere you can find...post that Scrapbooking Made Simple Peep's LOVE, LOVE, LOVE their products! Then, come back here and tell me that you posted on one or both!

The advent of modern photography began with the first permanent photograph created by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce in 1826.[7] This allowed the average person to begin to incorporate photographs into their scrapbooks. However, books or albums made specifically for showcasing photographs alone were not popularized in the United States until closer to 1860. Before that point, photographs were not thought of as items to be reproduced and shared. Demand for photo albums was spurred on in large part by the growing popularity of the carte de visite, a small photograph distributed in the same manner one might a visiting card.[6]
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