I have called monthly. Customer Service has been very polite but completely unable to do anything. They were "overwhelmed" with orders. They are currently processing orders from the first day of ordering-- but my order number is 200 higher than  the batch they are currently processing. Since it has taken three months to get this far, they understandably cannot predict when mine will be processed. (Sarcasm intended.)  

I REALLY, REALLY liked this store. I travel about 60 miles to visit it.  I would have given it FIVE… I REALLY, REALLY liked this store. I travel about 60 miles to visit it.  I would have given it FIVE stars because I like the owner and what she is trying to do. Her creations for the Shop that Did Not Hop are fantastic!  I like the Youtube videos a lot-- very helpful.

Then, we add in the latest 12 colors of I... Zink Diamond Glitter by Aladine and you have a WINNER WINNER CHICKEN DINNER. Yep, this is the glitter that needs no glue and drys in a snap. Seriously, in most cases it dries in under a minute. No more leaving your projects to dry over night or worse yet....smudging them when you accidentally touch them!!!

In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.
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