Fabulous store! They carry a ton of products; dies, stamps, paper, ribbon, gelatos , copics, watercolors, etc. if you need it they probably have it. The store is laid out very well and each product displayed well. Some are grouped well together in project ideas. The staff is extremely knowledgeable, kind and helpful. The products are priced very well.  Parking is pretty easy but the parking lot does have a bit of seedy element to it.

Jump up ^ Jarvik, Elaine (1997-04-23). "Memories & mementos". Deseret News. p. C1. [P]eople trace scrapbooking's early beginnings to Marielen Christensen, a Spanish Fork homemaker who began in the mid-1970s to research ways to better preserve family records and memories. ... When Christensen discovered sources for more durable materials and acid-free papers and glues, she began to spread the word, first at the World Conference on Records in 1980 in Salt Lake City and later at BYU Education Week. In 1981, the Christensens (who by then had made more than 50 scrapbooks for their own family) wrote a how-to book and started a mail-order business, Keeping Memories Alive, to sell archival supplies.
People who are complaining are probably not watching Stacey's YouTube videos, or are simply not understanding that "It ships when it ships" is the bottom line. They tell you truthfully , upfront so you have a chance to make the decision to purchase, so I feel it's very unfair to then get upset when your purchase doesn't arrive in a time frame that you decided would be acceptable in your own mind.
I purchased the Beloved Kaleidoscope die collection and absolutely love them.  It took over a month to receive, but well worth the wait!   I called to check on my order by phone and was helped by Claire.  Claire was wonderful and fun to chat with.  Thank you to Stacey for the wonderful Youtube demos, and I will be shopping with you again soon.....hoping to be able to visit the store if I can get hubby to drive me to SoCal.
Please come into our online store and feel free to shop around. Take a look at our monthly specials as well as our already low low prices. Because we are strictly online we are able to keep our prices below the competition. We have scrapbooking stickers, tools, paper, die cuts, eyelets, buttons, stamps, stamp pads, and many other items. We carry over 100 brand names such as Jolee's, Sandylion, Soft Spoken, Pebbles Inc., EK Success, Provo Craft, Making Memories, Kaisercraft, Darice, K & Company, DaisyD, Spellbinders and many more.
In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.
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