For example, college women around the turn of the century used scrapbooks extensively to construct representations of their everyday life as students. Without photograph albums to provide images of these life events, students created unique representations through scrapbooks in order to illustrate their lives using ephemera and memorabilia. A guest list or group of visiting cards might represent a young woman’s visit to a party. A playbill and ticket stub might serve as reminders of a trip to New York to see a Broadway show. Solid objects such as plants, silverware, or small trinkets were also used when further visual representation was needed.
The first step in the Play-to-Create system is to design our layout. Coming up with a design idea that you can be confident about can be the hardest step in the scrapbooking process. Too often we will stare at our materials for hours, trying to will an idea into existence, or we will surf endlessly on the internet trying to find some inspiration. We may resort to sketching something out on a piece of paper, but the end result is never quite what we imagined it would be.
Scrapbooking is a method of preserving, presenting, arranging personal and family history in the form of a book, box, card. Typical memorabilia include photographs, printed media, and artwork. Scrapbook albums are often decorated and frequently contain extensive journaling. Scrapbooking started in the United Kingdom in the nineteenth century, but is now primarily a United States phenomenon.
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