An international standard, ISO 18902, provides specific guidelines on materials that are safe for scrapbooking through its requirements for albums, framing, and storage materials. ISO 18902 includes requirements for photo-safety and a specific pH range for acid-free materials. ISO 18902 prohibits the use of harmful materials, including Polyvinyl chloride (PVC) and Cellulose nitrate.
Doodles, photos, sketches, paintings, oh my! Journals are more free-form and try to capture the essence of the moment without being too precious about it. Perfectionists need not apply here. Let yourself relax (it’s ok to do this while on vacation AND when you return to real life) and let your mind and hand wander across your journal. You can create vintage looks with old magazines or glue, too.

Now, wha...t do we have for you today? Welp, how about a chance to be a WINNER WINNER and receive a wonderful prize package form SMS filled with the latest and greatest collection from Contour Creations? What do you have to post? Well, Aussie Andrew got the crazy idea to head on down to Florida to talk to a certain retailer about a Couture Creations - Scrapbooking Made Simple - Simply Defined Collaboration. For a chance to WIN, all you have to do is post what retailer YOU think he went to visit!!! And, just as an FYI, I am so not holding my breath about this! It might just be a bit outside MY comfort zone :)
In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.
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