Gather up the storage bins from around the house - there’s room for it all in this beautiful, patented cabinet! With everything in sight and within reach, exploring your creativity has never been easier (or more fun!). The WorkBox 3.0 is our most popular furniture piece, offering an amazing hideaway workspace for any type of crafter.  Currently your order will ship in 2-6 weeks.

Cardstock is the firm paper onto which you’ll glue your photos and embellishments. Typically, it's more flexible than paperboard, but stiffer than standard paper. You can find cardstock in a wide range of solid colours, patterns and textures, so it's easy to choose a look that matches your theme. Consider solid-colour cardstock if you plan on tearing pages for effect and don't want to expose an unattractive white core. Look for acid and lignin-free cardstock for decorated pages that will resist fading and discolouring over time.

Take free video classes from top teachers and designers. Learn how to make beautiful cards, meaningful scrapbook layouts, and other handmade projects. Explore everything from beginning stamping to advanced die cutting and everything else you can imagine. Other sites charge $20 to $40 for similar classes, but Scrapbook.com offers these lessons at no cost.
Now, wha...t do we have for you today? Welp, how about a chance to be a WINNER WINNER and receive a wonderful prize package form SMS filled with the latest and greatest collection from Contour Creations? What do you have to post? Well, Aussie Andrew got the crazy idea to head on down to Florida to talk to a certain retailer about a Couture Creations - Scrapbooking Made Simple - Simply Defined Collaboration. For a chance to WIN, all you have to do is post what retailer YOU think he went to visit!!! And, just as an FYI, I am so not holding my breath about this! It might just be a bit outside MY comfort zone :)

During the 19th century, scrapbooking was seen as a more involved way to preserve one’s experiences than journaling or other writing-based forms of logging. Printed material such as cheap newspapers, visiting cards, playbills, and pamphlets circulated widely during the 19th century and often became the primary components of peoples’ scrapbooks.[5] The growing volume of ephemera of this kind, parallel to the growth of industrialized society, created a demand for methods of cataloguing and preserving them. This is why scrapbooks devoted solely to cataloguing recipes, coupons, or other lists were also common during this time. Until later in the 19th century, scrapbooks were seen as functional as well as aesthetically pleasing.[6] Several factors, including marketing strategies and technological advancement, contributed to the image of scrapbooking moving further toward the aesthetic plane over the years.
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