A NEW manufacturer comes to Scrapbooking Made Simple today! Let's all welcome Studio Light and their incredibly affordable decoupage books. When I say "bang for your buck", I mean it when it comes to this products. It is all stunning. It is all easy to use. It allows you to keep things simple or BAM...take them up a notch! It really is a wonderful product for all types of crafters!
Jump up ^ Jarvik, Elaine (1997-04-23). "Memories & mementos". Deseret News. p. C1. [P]eople trace scrapbooking's early beginnings to Marielen Christensen, a Spanish Fork homemaker who began in the mid-1970s to research ways to better preserve family records and memories. ... When Christensen discovered sources for more durable materials and acid-free papers and glues, she began to spread the word, first at the World Conference on Records in 1980 in Salt Lake City and later at BYU Education Week. In 1981, the Christensens (who by then had made more than 50 scrapbooks for their own family) wrote a how-to book and started a mail-order business, Keeping Memories Alive, to sell archival supplies.
This store is also a true "Mom and Pop" store that has been run by Tracey and her parents. Many of you have come to know and love this family. You were their when Tracey and her family welcomed Tracey's daughter Amber into their lives and when Tracey lost her belove...d dad. They have had up's, downs and a whole lotta hanging in their trying to keep their doors open. And, like I said, many of you So. Cal Peep's have become family to this store.
For example, college women around the turn of the century used scrapbooks extensively to construct representations of their everyday life as students. Without photograph albums to provide images of these life events, students created unique representations through scrapbooks in order to illustrate their lives using ephemera and memorabilia. A guest list or group of visiting cards might represent a young woman’s visit to a party. A playbill and ticket stub might serve as reminders of a trip to New York to see a Broadway show. Solid objects such as plants, silverware, or small trinkets were also used when further visual representation was needed.
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