Add beautiful and elegant foiled design to your paper craft projects with Spellbinders Glimmer Hot Foil System - NOW 20% OFF! The foil is available in 5” x 15” individual rolls and variety four packs in various colors. The heat activated foil is for use with Spellbinders Glimmer Hot Foil System and you’ll love how easy it is to create crafts for your wedding, graduation, birthdays, holidays and many other events. Get started on your projects today!
They have been updating their systems and hiring new employees, but in order to continue giving the deep discounts to their customers and still be profitable, they can't go hiring hundreds of employees to manage all their orders or spend tens of thousands on a better system.  They offer free shipping on most items with a $50 or more order.  There are a few items that weigh so much they cannot offer free shipping.  With each new change that has been implemented, there have been improvements on shipping times.  They are doing what they can and eventually they will find that formula that works best to reduce ship times to the best they possibly can.  It's all a matter of finding those solutions.  The owners of this store really want the best for their customers which is why they work so hard to get amazing products at amazing prices.
Jump up ^ Strauss, Robert (2001-09-16). "Getting the Hang of Hanging Out". The New York Times. Retrieved 2007-11-04. From 5 to 10 p.m. on those nights, at least a dozen women gather at the tables in the back room. For $5, the store buys them pizza and soda and they get use of the cutting materials and, of course, buy other stuff. You bring your photos and you get scrapbooking ideas.
The Scrapping Bug is firmly committed to our mission statement and will continue to strive to fulfill and indeed surpass these objectives in our efforts to earn your valued business. It is our ongoing commitment at The Scrapping Bug to assist you in your desire to expand your scrapbook skills, make available the latest and most up to date products in the industry and keep your purchase price the most competitive in the market place.
Please do NOT purchase anything online or order in the store or you may wait over 3 months like me to receive your PAID product!!! A friend and I went to this store in August 2013 and I ordered a $ 9 stamp set and she ordered a Halloween die for less then $10. The store sale was 20% off entire store. My friend grabbed the last stamp "My Favorite Things a la modes Fight like a Girl" and so I paid for it and Stacey said she would still give us the 20% off and ship both our orders to us free since they were out of stock on these items. I gave her my address to mail both items to save her shipping costs. A couple of months went by and I contacted Stacey on her facebook page for the store 12/9/13 inquiring about our product. She told me our order was mailed out late October 2013 and she would contact USPS and if she had to then resend another order and call me to verify my address. I left my address on her facebook page and still have not heard from her as of DECEMBER 14, 2013 !! I filled out a complaint online to the Better Business Bureau. I received a confirmation email from BBB stating she has until January 17, 2014 to respond to this complaint. I read Several complaints on her facebook page about the poor or lack of customer service on prepaid orders, especially online orders never being fulfilled, customers never being contacted on their orders. Stacey's response to one lady was "We are a small Mom and Pop shop...." WOW ! Really! I think it's ridiculous that she continues to have Big sales events, free make and takes every weekend, and people are prepaying for orders either in her store or online and yet we all sit here and wait for our PREPAID merchandise !!! Doesn't matter if a store is big or small...Customer's shouldn't have to wait over 3 months to receive something they already paid for and not one person from her store contact the customer!!!
Just watched the owner of this business berate the employees at a local restaurant for about ten minutes. All while wearing the sweatshirt bearing her company logo and repeatedly touting the fact that she was a local business owner. Good for her I guess? Super professional of her. So go here if you support that kind of behavior. Or you could just hit up the local craft stores instead.
Instant cameras and film are ridiculously fun, creative ways for making and sharing memories. Paste them into books, with as much or as little text as you desire, or pick a wall in your home/office to create a personalized art installation. They can be used to make a baby book or be more travel-centric. Also, whether you have a classic Polaroid or a new Instax, they are so easy to use, that your kids can have their own roll of film to capture memories of their own. Photo strips from photo booths work great, too!
In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.
×