Document your December festivities for every day of the month with the December Days 2018 Complete Bundle. You can easily build a holiday album of your daily activities with all the fun pieces included in this album kit. Capture your night of ice skating, picking out your family Christmas tree, visiting Santa and all of your other favorite family traditions that you do to celebrate the most wonderful time of the year! Regularly $34, right now you can get this 138-piece bundle for ONLY $24.99! Grab your Album Kit today!
Marielen Wadley Christensen (pronounced as the names "Mary Ellen"), of Elk Ridge, Utah, United States (formerly of Spanish Fork, Utah) is credited with turning scrapbooking from what was once just the ages-old hobby into the actual industry containing businesses devoted specifically to the manufacturing and sale of scrapbooking supplies. She began designing creative pages for her family's photo memories, inserting the completed pages into sheet protectors collected in 3-ring binders. By 1980, she had assembled over fifty volumes and was invited to display them at the World Conference on Records in Salt Lake City. In 1981 Marielen and her husband Anthony Jay ("A.J.") authored and published a how-to booklet, Keeping Memories Alive, and opened a scrapbook store in Spanish Fork that ended up with the same name, that remains open today.[11][12]
Just like old memories, scrapbook pages often benefit from a few embellishments. There's endless array of arts and crafts decorations available to add spice and pizazz to your journaling. Your options include ribbons, glitter, 3D stickers, and self-adhesive chipboard pieces featuring words or phrases relevant to your theme. In keeping with your personal style and the type of scrapbook you're creating, you can mix and match multiple embellishments to add flair to your story and make your pages pop.
The scrapbooking industry doubled in size between 2001 and 2004 to $2.5 billion[17] with over 1,600 companies creating scrapbooking products by 2003. Creative Memories, a home-based retailer of scrapbooking supplies founded in 1987, saw $425 million in retail sales in 2004.[18] Creative Memories' parent company did file Chapter 11 in 2013 and became the bankruptcy with the largest debt in the Twin City area.[19]

I REALLY, REALLY liked this store. I travel about 60 miles to visit it.  I would have given it FIVE… I REALLY, REALLY liked this store. I travel about 60 miles to visit it.  I would have given it FIVE stars because I like the owner and what she is trying to do. Her creations for the Shop that Did Not Hop are fantastic!  I like the Youtube videos a lot-- very helpful.

Shop the largest papercrafting shop in the world and get everything you need for your handmade craft projects in one easy-to-use place. You'll find a wide selection of scrapbook paper, albums, die cutting machines and dies, stamps, inks and much more. Scrapbook.com offers a 60-day money-back guarantee and 5-star customer service so you can shop with confidence.
And for a chance to be a WINNER WINNER Chicken Dinner Peep here at Scrapbooking Made Simple...all you have to do is tell me the NEW Simply Defined product that you would want to WIN! You have three choices....Would you want to WIN Some of the NEW Simply Defined Dies, Simply Defined Stamps or Simply Defined Hot Foil Plates?? To see the entire collection, click the link to the You Tube SALE!!!
Jump up ^ Jarvik, Elaine (1997-04-23). "Memories & mementos". Deseret News. p. C1. [P]eople trace scrapbooking's early beginnings to Marielen Christensen, a Spanish Fork homemaker who began in the mid-1970s to research ways to better preserve family records and memories. ... When Christensen discovered sources for more durable materials and acid-free papers and glues, she began to spread the word, first at the World Conference on Records in 1980 in Salt Lake City and later at BYU Education Week. In 1981, the Christensens (who by then had made more than 50 scrapbooks for their own family) wrote a how-to book and started a mail-order business, Keeping Memories Alive, to sell archival supplies.

During the 19th century, scrapbooking was seen as a more involved way to preserve one’s experiences than journaling or other writing-based forms of logging. Printed material such as cheap newspapers, visiting cards, playbills, and pamphlets circulated widely during the 19th century and often became the primary components of peoples’ scrapbooks.[5] The growing volume of ephemera of this kind, parallel to the growth of industrialized society, created a demand for methods of cataloguing and preserving them. This is why scrapbooks devoted solely to cataloguing recipes, coupons, or other lists were also common during this time. Until later in the 19th century, scrapbooks were seen as functional as well as aesthetically pleasing.[6] Several factors, including marketing strategies and technological advancement, contributed to the image of scrapbooking moving further toward the aesthetic plane over the years.
×