Now, sadly, we do not ship 12 x 12 paper as we are just not good at it! We don't want you to have any bent corners :) So, we are stocking their 8 x 8 Paper Pads and all the lovely embellishments to go with! I have to give Graphic 45 and their wonderful staff a BIG SHOUT OUT as they have all... been so wahooo kachooo ahhhmazing! I think that they are as excited to be back at SMS as we are to have their newest lovelies that so make my heart happy!!
Scrapbooking is one of the largest categories within the craft and hobby industry and now considered[by whom?] to be the third most popular craft in the nation. From 1996 through 2004, sales of scrapbooking products increased across the United States. In 2005, annual sales flattened for the first time after many back to back years of double growth. From 2006 through 2010 traditional scrapbooking sales have declined, while digital forms of scrapbooking have grown. Traditional scrapbooking sales for 2010 have declined to about $1.6 billion in annual sales from a peak of about $2.5 billion in 2005.[28]
Following the lead of Keeping Memories Alive (which was originally in the smaller building next door and named The Annex in its early years), many other stores have popped up and cater to the scrapbooking community. These shops provide many of the necessary tools for every scrapbooker's needs. Besides Keeping Memories Alive, these include companies such as Creative Memories, Making Memories, Stampin' Up!, and Close to My Heart.
OK, cancel my order. Oh no--they report they "cannot" cancel my order Computer quirk?. (No, this is being done manually. The orders were printed out and are kept in binders. The way you cancel it is to remove the order page from the binder!) Meanwhile, no apologies from the owner, no updates, no "sorry we screwed up by drastically underestimating demand and here's a coupon for you.."
The advent of modern photography began with the first permanent photograph created by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce in 1826.[7] This allowed the average person to begin to incorporate photographs into their scrapbooks. However, books or albums made specifically for showcasing photographs alone were not popularized in the United States until closer to 1860. Before that point, photographs were not thought of as items to be reproduced and shared. Demand for photo albums was spurred on in large part by the growing popularity of the carte de visite, a small photograph distributed in the same manner one might a visiting card.[6]
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