Just watched the owner of this business berate the employees at a local restaurant for about ten minutes. All while wearing the sweatshirt bearing her company logo and repeatedly touting the fact that she was a local business owner. Good for her I guess? Super professional of her. So go here if you support that kind of behavior. Or you could just hit up the local craft stores instead.
A scrapbooking, card makers and crafters dream. We do day, weekend and weekday crops and retreats. Our studio is set up for scrapbooking, card making and all kinds of crafting, as well as classes and crops. The studio has amazing natural light, plus we have installed LED lights above work stations, and have even added Ott Lites to each work station.  Each station also comes with a self healing magnetic mat and a basket with some essential tool. The studio is setup with all the latest tools and toys to play with. The building has WIFI for your use will you visit as well.
The advent of modern photography began with the first permanent photograph created by Joseph Nicéphore Niépce in 1826.[7] This allowed the average person to begin to incorporate photographs into their scrapbooks. However, books or albums made specifically for showcasing photographs alone were not popularized in the United States until closer to 1860. Before that point, photographs were not thought of as items to be reproduced and shared. Demand for photo albums was spurred on in large part by the growing popularity of the carte de visite, a small photograph distributed in the same manner one might a visiting card.[6]

Who is ready for this weeks You Tube....Good 'cause here it is! We are featuring Inky Antics HoneyPOP Collection of stamps and honeycomb paper along with Sizzix Movers and Shapers Dies by Tim Holtz and Stephanie Barnard! Sooooo much fun to create with all of these goodies! And...they are a You Tube Yummies...so they are ON SALE in the shop and online! 

Fabulous store! They carry a ton of products; dies, stamps, paper, ribbon, gelatos , copics, watercolors, etc. if you need it they probably have it. The store is laid out very well and each product displayed well. Some are grouped well together in project ideas. The staff is extremely knowledgeable, kind and helpful. The products are priced very well.  Parking is pretty easy but the parking lot does have a bit of seedy element to it.
The Card Making Collection Kit from Tonic Studios is perfect for all crafters, from beginner to advance! You will receive easy-to-follow, step-by-step magazine guide which also includes 79 stunning designs that you can create using this kit. Everything from perfect paper folding to expert embossing, off-the-page DIY crafts, clever cards and elegant ideas using your kit. Regularly $70, today you can get this Kit for ONLY $19.99!
Take free video classes from top teachers and designers. Learn how to make beautiful cards, meaningful scrapbook layouts, and other handmade projects. Explore everything from beginning stamping to advanced die cutting and everything else you can imagine. Other sites charge $20 to $40 for similar classes, but Scrapbook.com offers these lessons at no cost.
In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.
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