K&COMPANY-SMASH Blue Folio Bundle. This kit is a packed full of fun items and will help you get a jump on creating your first SMASH project. This package contains one 8x10 inch folio with photo sleeves, one SMASHstick pen and glue, one elastic pen band, seventy sticky notes, one list pad, one wallet folio, two paper clips, eight sticker strips, one roll of tape, one resealable decorative bag. Imported.
And for a chance to be a WINNER WINNER Chicken Dinner Peep here at Scrapbooking Made Simple...all you have to do is tell me the NEW Simply Defined product that you would want to WIN! You have three choices....Would you want to WIN Some of the NEW Simply Defined Dies, Simply Defined Stamps or Simply Defined Hot Foil Plates?? To see the entire collection, click the link to the You Tube SALE!!!
You might not know this, but the Anita's brand of products is part of the DoCrafts family! Their Foiled Decoupage is some of the very best that you can find! It is both stunning and affordable all at the same times! Each of the sheets below will let you make not 1, not 2 but 3 wonderful embellishments... for your cards, layouts, tags, gift bags...heck....just about everything! And, the very best part is that they are only $1.50 per sheet...Yep...even with all that yummy foiling they have added!
This is a really cute store with everything you need for cards and scrapbooking. I came here for their "garage sale" and bought wonderful things for unbelievable prices. Their normal items are at reasonable also. BUT...if you order anything online it takes a very long to receive, regardless of "shop that didn't hop" sales. I've been waiting 10 weeks and they still cannot give me a delivery time of my products, some items are in stock but will be delivered with the "close out" items. Very disappointing.
Another variation is the introduction and growth of pocket scrapbooking, most well known and represented by Project Life created and introduced by Becky Higgins. Higgins created the system in response to her personal desire to continue record the lives of her children and family, but in a quicker, more simple way that allowed her the flexibility to complete the project, but still in an attractive, cohesive way.[22]

During the 19th century, scrapbooking was seen as a more involved way to preserve one’s experiences than journaling or other writing-based forms of logging. Printed material such as cheap newspapers, visiting cards, playbills, and pamphlets circulated widely during the 19th century and often became the primary components of peoples’ scrapbooks.[5] The growing volume of ephemera of this kind, parallel to the growth of industrialized society, created a demand for methods of cataloguing and preserving them. This is why scrapbooks devoted solely to cataloguing recipes, coupons, or other lists were also common during this time. Until later in the 19th century, scrapbooks were seen as functional as well as aesthetically pleasing.[6] Several factors, including marketing strategies and technological advancement, contributed to the image of scrapbooking moving further toward the aesthetic plane over the years.
×