People who are complaining are probably not watching Stacey's YouTube videos, or are simply not understanding that "It ships when it ships" is the bottom line. They tell you truthfully , upfront so you have a chance to make the decision to purchase, so I feel it's very unfair to then get upset when your purchase doesn't arrive in a time frame that you decided would be acceptable in your own mind.

Adhesives are literally the glue that keeps your project together. Your options include glue sticks, tape runner, rubber cement, and glue dots. Rubber cement is recommended for bulky, uneven decorations that standard glue can’t quite stick. Non-permanent adhesives are helpful for readjusting photos or patterned paper. For inevitable mistakes, thankfully there’s adhesive remover. Using quality, archival-safe glues will help your masterpiece stay together for years to come. 
In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.
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