Your scrapbook album is where you'll arrange and store your decorated memories. Choose an album that's an appropriate size and has the right number of pages for the project you're undertaking. The three basic album sizes are 8” x 8”, 8” x 11” and 12” x 12.” Albums are sold in a variety of colors, patterns and materials. Be sure to choose a durable material that will last as long as the items inside. 
Hi there! I am Stacey, owner of Scrapbooking Made Simple, a retail and online store! Every Saturday, we bring you a You Tube Class Called "Saturday's With Stacey"! These classes are all about using what you may already own, showing you new products all while keeping this great hobby affordable! So, please subscribe to our channel and welcome to Scrapbooking Made Simple!
For example, for a page of black and white photos, an elegant paper is usually the most suitable paper print. After you have selected a themed paper, you can then go ahead and select a cardstock matt or a coordinating plain paper to frame or mat the photos. It’s important to note that if you have selected the double paged spread, then you can either decide to use two background papers that match or you can select two papers that coordinate.
One of the key components of modern scrapbooking is the archival quality of the supplies. Designed to preserve photographs and journaling in their original state, materials encouraged by most serious scrapbookers are of a higher quality than those of many typical photo albums commercially available. Scrappers insist on acid-free, lignin-free papers, stamp ink, and embossing powder. They also use pigment-based inks, which are fade resistant, colorfast, and often waterproof. Many scrappers use buffered paper, which will protect photos from acid in memorabilia used in the scrapbook. Older "magnetic" albums are not acid-free and thus cause damage to the photos and memorabilia included in them. Gloves, too, are used to protect photos from the oil on hands.[23]
Plenty of free parking with no time limits because they have their own parking lot. This shop is in a center with 4 different food establishments. YES! If you're a scrapbooker, you know why that's important. And the no time limit parking. As soon as you enter, you'll see two work tables. I thought this was it... but then we ventured to the back and oh boy! That is a HUGE work area. Love it! Larger than any of the scrapbooking places I've been to in Orange County. I used to frequent 3 different ones. Some snacks and water are complementary... maybe I shouldn't have said that coz there might be some shameless people that would go and just grab the snacks without purchasing anything. But they are there for those scrapping. Hey, the longer you stay there, the more likely you are to buy more stuff. Yeah, I was only supposed to buy a couple of pages and cut a couple of things... I walked out with $40 worth of paper! The papers are kinda expensive, which is normal... but they don't have a sales rack, which I haven't seen before. The ladies are extremely helpful. I WILL BE BACK! THIS WEEK IF I CAN!!!

The scrapbooking industry doubled in size between 2001 and 2004 to $2.5 billion[17] with over 1,600 companies creating scrapbooking products by 2003. Creative Memories, a home-based retailer of scrapbooking supplies founded in 1987, saw $425 million in retail sales in 2004.[18] Creative Memories' parent company did file Chapter 11 in 2013 and became the bankruptcy with the largest debt in the Twin City area.[19]


Doodles, photos, sketches, paintings, oh my! Journals are more free-form and try to capture the essence of the moment without being too precious about it. Perfectionists need not apply here. Let yourself relax (it’s ok to do this while on vacation AND when you return to real life) and let your mind and hand wander across your journal. You can create vintage looks with old magazines or glue, too.
Following the lead of Keeping Memories Alive (which was originally in the smaller building next door and named The Annex in its early years), many other stores have popped up and cater to the scrapbooking community. These shops provide many of the necessary tools for every scrapbooker's needs. Besides Keeping Memories Alive, these include companies such as Creative Memories, Making Memories, Stampin' Up!, and Close to My Heart.
Basic materials include background papers (including printed and cardstock paper), photo corner mounts (or other means of mounting photos such as adhesive dots, photo mounting tape, or acid-free glue), scissors, a paper trimmer or cutting tool, art pens, archival pens for journaling, and mounting glues (like thermo-tac). More elaborate designs require more specialized tools such as die cut templates, rubber stamps, craft punches, stencils, inking tools, eyelet setters, heat embossing tools and personal die cut machines. A lot of time people who enjoy scrapbooking will create their own background papers by using the tools mentioned along with "fancy" textured scissors.
I actually just got started into rubber stamping and die cutting and stuff. (I have had a Sizzix Big Kick machine for years, and haven't used it much.  Finding out that these die cuts that are available with some stamps work with this machine, got me into using it again!)  You see, I do cross stitch.  But the magazines I get from the bookstore comes from the uk.  And two magazines went out of production, so there aren't many  cross stitch designs for cards, anymore.  So i thought i would try cross stitching designs with rubber stamping (cling/clear, whatever you call it) combined!

The first step in the Play-to-Create system is to design our layout. Coming up with a design idea that you can be confident about can be the hardest step in the scrapbooking process. Too often we will stare at our materials for hours, trying to will an idea into existence, or we will surf endlessly on the internet trying to find some inspiration. We may resort to sketching something out on a piece of paper, but the end result is never quite what we imagined it would be.


They have been updating their systems and hiring new employees, but in order to continue giving the deep discounts to their customers and still be profitable, they can't go hiring hundreds of employees to manage all their orders or spend tens of thousands on a better system.  They offer free shipping on most items with a $50 or more order.  There are a few items that weigh so much they cannot offer free shipping.  With each new change that has been implemented, there have been improvements on shipping times.  They are doing what they can and eventually they will find that formula that works best to reduce ship times to the best they possibly can.  It's all a matter of finding those solutions.  The owners of this store really want the best for their customers which is why they work so hard to get amazing products at amazing prices.
People who are complaining are probably not watching Stacey's YouTube videos, or are simply not understanding that "It ships when it ships" is the bottom line. They tell you truthfully , upfront so you have a chance to make the decision to purchase, so I feel it's very unfair to then get upset when your purchase doesn't arrive in a time frame that you decided would be acceptable in your own mind.
During the 19th century, scrapbooking was seen as a more involved way to preserve one’s experiences than journaling or other writing-based forms of logging. Printed material such as cheap newspapers, visiting cards, playbills, and pamphlets circulated widely during the 19th century and often became the primary components of peoples’ scrapbooks.[5] The growing volume of ephemera of this kind, parallel to the growth of industrialized society, created a demand for methods of cataloguing and preserving them. This is why scrapbooks devoted solely to cataloguing recipes, coupons, or other lists were also common during this time. Until later in the 19th century, scrapbooks were seen as functional as well as aesthetically pleasing.[6] Several factors, including marketing strategies and technological advancement, contributed to the image of scrapbooking moving further toward the aesthetic plane over the years.
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