Early digital scrapbooks were created from digital photos uploaded to an external site. Over time, this moved to a model of downloading software onto a personal computer that will organize photos and help create the digital scrapbook. With the growth of Web 2.0 functionality, digital scrapbooking is going back online, to avoid the hassles of having to download and install PC software. The availability of cheap online storage (e.g., on Amazon's S3 service), and the desire to leverage pre-uploaded online albums (e.g., on Yahoo's Flickr) make it more convenient for users to directly compose their digital scrapbooks online. Print on demand fulfillment enables such digital scrapbooks to effectively supplant traditional scrapbooks.
The advent of scanners, desktop publishing, page layout programs, and advanced printing options make it relatively easy to create professional-looking layouts in digital form. The internet allows scrapbookers to self-publish their work. Scrapbooks that exist completely in digital image form are referred to as "digital scrapbooks" or "computer scrapbooks".[24]
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First and foremost, begin the process by selecting photos on the theme, idea, or event you’ve decided to work on. Perhaps you want to showcase a certain vacation or your child’s first birthday celebration. Or maybe you want to create a scrapbook for a friend or family member. During the creation process, plan on using your photos as a narration of the theme.
The Scrapping Bug is firmly committed to our mission statement and will continue to strive to fulfill and indeed surpass these objectives in our efforts to earn your valued business. It is our ongoing commitment at The Scrapping Bug to assist you in your desire to expand your scrapbook skills, make available the latest and most up to date products in the industry and keep your purchase price the most competitive in the market place.

I REALLY, REALLY liked this store. I travel about 60 miles to visit it.  I would have given it FIVE… I REALLY, REALLY liked this store. I travel about 60 miles to visit it.  I would have given it FIVE stars because I like the owner and what she is trying to do. Her creations for the Shop that Did Not Hop are fantastic!  I like the Youtube videos a lot-- very helpful.
Doodles, photos, sketches, paintings, oh my! Journals are more free-form and try to capture the essence of the moment without being too precious about it. Perfectionists need not apply here. Let yourself relax (it’s ok to do this while on vacation AND when you return to real life) and let your mind and hand wander across your journal. You can create vintage looks with old magazines or glue, too.
Many consider journaling one of the most important elements of any scrapbook.[29] Journaling is a personal choice and it can describe the event, the photographs, or relate feelings and emotions. Handwritten journaling is considered best by some scrapbookers who see handwriting as valuable for posterity, but many people journal on the computer and print it onto a variety of surfaces including vellum, tape, ribbon, and paper.
Basic materials include background papers (including printed and cardstock paper), photo corner mounts (or other means of mounting photos such as adhesive dots, photo mounting tape, or acid-free glue), scissors, a paper trimmer or cutting tool, art pens, archival pens for journaling, and mounting glues (like thermo-tac). More elaborate designs require more specialized tools such as die cut templates, rubber stamps, craft punches, stencils, inking tools, eyelet setters, heat embossing tools and personal die cut machines. A lot of time people who enjoy scrapbooking will create their own background papers by using the tools mentioned along with "fancy" textured scissors.
In the 15th century, commonplace books, popular in England, emerged as a way to compile information that included recipes, quotations, letters, poems and more. Each commonplace book was unique to its creator's particular interests. Friendship albums became popular in the 16th century. These albums were used much like modern day yearbooks, where friends or patrons would enter their names, titles and short texts or illustrations at the request of the album's owner. These albums were often created as souvenirs of European tours and would contain local memorabilia including coats of arms or works of art commissioned by local artisans.[1] Starting in 1570, it became fashionable to incorporate colored plates depicting popular scenes such as Venetian costumes or Carnival scenes. These provided affordable options as compared to original works and, as such, these plates were not sold to commemorate or document a specific event, but specifically as embellishments for albums.[1] In 1775, James Granger published a history of England with several blank pages at the end of the book. The pages were designed to allow the book's owner to personalize the book with his own memorabilia.[2] The practice of pasting engravings, lithographs and other illustrations into books, or even taking the books apart, inserting new matter, and rebinding them, became known as extra-illustrating or grangerizing.[2] Additionally, friendship albums and school yearbooks afforded girls in the 18th and 19th centuries an outlet through which to share their literary skills, and allowed girls an opportunity to document their own personalized historical record[3][4] previously not readily available to them.
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